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Gout

Gout

A buildup of uric acid causes gout, which is a broad name for a
number of illnesses. Usually, the feet are affected by this buildup.
If you have gout, the joints in your foot, especially your big toe,
will most likely swell and hurt. Gout episodes can make your foot
feel like it’s on fire due to sudden and extreme pain.
A buildup of uric acid causes gout, which is a broad name for anumber of illnesses. Usually, the feet are affected by this buildup.
If you have gout, the joints in your foot, especially your big toe, will most likely swell and hurt. Gout episodes can make your foot feel like it’s on fire due to sudden and extreme pain.

Understanding Gout

Gout attacks without notice and, for some reason, in the middle of the night. It’s a severe discomfort in a joint, usually the big toe, although it can also affect the knees, ankles, elbows, thumbs, or fingers.

Gout attacks can strike at any time and cause agonising agony. The pain and inflammation normally go away after a few days with prompt therapy. They could, however, happen again at any time.

Gout affects between one and two people in every 100 people in the United Kingdom. Men over 30 and women after menopause are the most commonly affected. Gout is more common in men than it is in women.

What are the
symptoms of
Gout

Pure Medical - Gout Symptoms Mobile

What are the symptoms of Gout?

Some people have an excessive amount of uric acid in their blood yet show no signs or symptoms. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is the term for this condition.

The development of uric acid crystals in your joint causes acute gout, which causes symptoms to appear immediately and linger for 3 to 10 days.

You’ll have severe pain and swelling, as well as a warm sensation in your joint. You won’t have any symptoms in between gout bouts.

Gout can develop chronic if left untreated. Tophi, or hard lumps, can form in your joints, as well as the skin and soft tissue surrounding them. These deposits can harm your joints in the long run.

To avoid gout becoming chronic, it is critical to get treatment as soon as possible.

What Causes
& Triggers Gout

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What Causes & Triggers Gout

Gout is caused by a buildup of uric acid in your blood caused by the breakdown of purines.

Blood and metabolic issues, as well as dehydration, cause your body to create too much uric acid.

It may be more difficult for your body to remove excess uric acid if you have a kidney or thyroid problem, or if you have an inherited illness.

If you do any of the following, you’re more likely to develop gout:

  • Are a middle-aged man or a postmenopausal woman
  • Have parents, siblings, or other family members with gout
  • Drink alcohol
  • Take medications such as diuretics and cyclosporine
  • Have a condition like high blood pressure, kidney disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, or sleep apnea

Consumption of foods high in gout-producing purines can develop gout in some persons.

Gout symptoms can be triggered by certain foods, drugs, and medical conditions. You may need to avoid or limit foods and beverages high in purines, such as the following:

  • Red meat, such as pork and veal
  • Organ meats
  • Fish, such as cod, scallops, mussels, and salmon
  • Alcohol
  • Sodas
  • Fruit juice
Some medications you take to treat other problems raise your blood uric acid levels. If you take any of the following medications, consult your doctor:
  • Diuretics, or water pills
  • Aspirin
  • Blood pressure-lowering medications, such as beta-blockers and angiotensin II receptor blockers

Flare-ups could also be caused by your health. Gout has been connected to all of these conditions:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes or prediabetes
  • Dehydration
  • Joint injury
  • Infections
  • Congestive heart failure
  • High blood pressure
  • Kidney disease

It can be difficult to determine which of these things is causing your gout episodes. Keeping a diary is one approach to keep track of your nutrition, medications, and overall health in order to figure out what’s causing your symptoms.

How is
Gout diagnosed?

uric acid Test Mobile

How is Gout diagnosed?

A study of your medical history, a physical exam, and your symptoms can all help your doctor identify gout. Your doctor will most likely make a diagnosis based on:

  • your description of your joint pain
  • how often you’ve experienced intense pain in your joint
  • how red or swollen the area is

A test to look for uric acid buildup in your joint may also be ordered by your GP. A sample of joint fluid can be tested to see if it contains uric acid. They may also want to examine your joint with an X-ray.

Start by seeing your health care physician if you’re experiencing gout symptoms. If your gout is severe, you may need to consult a joint disease expert.

Gout Treatments

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Gout Treatments

Gout, if left untreated, can progress to gouty arthritis, a more severe form of arthritis. This painful illness can permanently damage and swell your joint.

Your doctor’s treatment approach will be determined by the stage and severity of your gout.

Gout medications act in one of two ways: they either ease pain and reduce inflammation, or they lower uric acid levels and prevent future gout attacks.

Gout pain can be relieved using the following medications:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin (Bufferin), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), and naproxen (Aleve)
  • Colchicine (Colcrys, Mitigare)
  • Corticosteroids

The following medications can help reduce gout attacks:

  • Xanthine oxidase inhibitors, such as allopurinol (Lopurin, Zyloprim) and febuxostat (Uloric)
  • Probenecid (Probalan)

Your doctor may recommend lifestyle modifications in addition to drugs to help manage your symptoms and lower your chance of future gout attacks. For instance, your doctor may advise you to:

  • Reduce your alcohol intake, if you drink
  • Lose weight, if you’re overweight
  • Quit smoking, if you smoke

A few complimentary therapies, as well, have shown potential.

 

Alternative and Complementary therapies used
when treating patients suffering with Gout

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

HBOT can help to reduce inflammation caused by immunological factors or infections. Furthermore, even if the disease is advanced, daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces the inflammatory response; nonetheless, hyperbaric oxygen therapy for Gout is more beneficial in the early stages of the disease.

Cryotherapy

In cases of shoulder impingement, cryotherapy can help to reduce inflammatory reactions. It can also be used to provide analgesic relief. The range of motion can be increased as a result of these effects. Cryotherapy can help to reduce inflammation in gouty joints in the short term.

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy at a concentration of 20 μg/ml was found to be an efficient biological dose for O3-AHT, with good curative efficacy and few side effects in patients with hyperuricemia and gout. As a result, low-dose O3-AHT could be a promising treatment option for hyperuricemia and gout patients.

Red Light Therapy

Red light therapy stimulates the release of endorphins (natural morphine); enabling the natural reduction of pain caused by gout. RLT relieves pain, increase blood flow and helps the body to reduce inflammation naturally.

Infrared Sauna therapy

Infrared sauna therapy help in the prevention of gout. Sauna sessions actually aid in the breakdown of uric acid crystals along with reducing acidity levels.

IV DRIP THERAPY

An IV line is inserted into a vein in your arm to provide medications during IV drip therapy. It can be used to relieve the symptoms of a current gout attack while also lowering the risk of future flare-ups and/or complications, such as tophus.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy outside the chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

HBOT can help to reduce inflammation caused by immunological factors or infections. Furthermore, even if the disease is advanced, daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces the inflammatory response; nonetheless, hyperbaric oxygen therapy for Gout is more beneficial in the early stages of the disease.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

In cases of shoulder impingement, cryotherapy can help to reduce inflammatory reactions. It can also be used to provide analgesic relief. The range of motion can be increased as a result of these effects. Cryotherapy can help to reduce inflammation in gouty joints in the short term.

Ozone Therapy

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy at a concentration of 20 μg/ml was found to be an efficient biological dose for O3-AHT, with good curative efficacy and few side effects in patients with hyperuricemia and gout. As a result, low-dose O3-AHT could be a promising treatment option for hyperuricemia and gout patients.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy

Red light therapy stimulates the release of endorphins (natural morphine); enabling the natural reduction of pain caused by gout. RLT relieves pain, increase blood flow and helps the body to reduce inflammation naturally.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy

Infrared sauna therapy help in the prevention of gout. Sauna sessions actually aid in the breakdown of uric acid crystals along with reducing acidity levels.

IV Drip Therapy

IV DRIP THERAPY

Medications for psoriasis are administered via IV drip infusion into the patient’s arms. Since infusion therapy delivers the medication directly into the patient’s bloodstream, many patients experience results more quickly than with other medications, usually within a week or two.

Essential oils

Essential oil for gout Mobile

Essential Oils

Aromatherapy uses essential oils, which are plant-based compounds. Anti-inflammatory, pain-relieving, and antimicrobial properties are thought to exist in certain oils.

The following are some of the essential oils that are used to treat gout:

  • Lemongrass oil
  • Celery seed oil
  • Yarrow oil extract
  • Olive leaf extract
  • Chinese cinnamon

Before you start using any essential oil, consult your doctor. Be aware that essential oils are not regulated and that the purity or quality of essential oils cannot be guaranteed, so do your homework on the brand.

When utilising essential oils, make sure to follow these safety precautions:

  • Do not apply essential oils to your skin directly. It’s crucial to dilute them with a carrier oil like coconut or jojoba oil first. Mix 20 drops of essential oil with 6 teaspoons of carrier oil for a 3 percent dilution, for example.
  • Essential oils are not safe to swallow, so don’t put them in your mouth.

Keep essential oils and carrier oils away from direct sunlight and heat in a cool, dark environment.

Home Remedies

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Home Remedies

Some home remedies may aid in the reduction of uric acid levels and the prevention of gout attacks. For gout, the following foods and beverages have been recommended:

  • Tart cherries
  • Magnesium
  • Ginger
  • Diluted apple cider vinegar
  • Celery
  • Nettle tea
  • Dandelion
  • Milk thistle seeds

However, these may not be adequate to treat gout on their own.

Foods to avoid

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Foods to avoid

Purines are naturally high in some foods, which your body converts to uric acid.
Foods high in purine can be tolerated by the majority of people. However, if your body has problems expelling excess uric acid, you should avoid the following meals and beverages:
  • Red meats
  • Organ meats
  • Certain seafood
  • Alcohol

Even if they don’t include purines, sugar-sweetened beverages and foods containing the sugar fructose can be troublesome.

If you have gout, you should eat foods that assist lower uric acid levels in the body.

alcohol can affect Gout

Like red meat and shellfish, alcohol also has a high content of purines. Uric acid is produced when your body breaks down purines.

 

Gout is more likely if you have a lot of uric acid in your system. Alcohol can also slow down the removal of uric acid from your body.

 

Gout does not affect everyone who drinks. However, excessive alcohol consumption (more than 12 drinks per week) can raise the risk,
particularly in men. Beer is more likely to influence the risk than liquor.

 

People have said that drinking alcohol causes their gout flare-ups in polls.

Surgery for Gout

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Surgery for Gout

Gout is usually treatable without surgery. However, over time, this disorder can cause joint degeneration, tendons tears, and infections in the skin surrounding the joints.

Tophi, or hard deposits, can form on your joints and in other areas, such as your ear. These lumps can be painful and large, and they can harm your joints permanently.

Tophi are treated with three surgical procedures:

  • Tophi removal surgery
  • Joint fusion surgery
  • Joint replacement surgery

The extent of the damage, the location of the tophi, and your personal preferences all influence which of these surgeries your doctor will suggest.

Prevention of Gout

Psoriatic Arthritis Risks

Prevention of Gout

Here are a few steps you can take to help prevent gout:

  • Limit the amount of alcohol you drink.
  • Limit your intake of purine-rich food, such as shellfish, and red meat; lamb, beef, pork, and organ meat.
  • Eat a low-fat, nondairy diet that is rich in vegetables.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Stay hydrated.

Ask your doctor how you can reduce your chance of gout attacks if you have medical conditions or take drugs that increase your risk of gout.

Gout with
tophus formation

Pure Medical - Gout with tophus

gout with tophus formation

Tophi appear as swollen, bulbous growths under the skin on your joints. Tophi are a symptom of gout, which is a condition in which uric acid crystallises in joints such as the feet and hands. Gout attacks are episodes of acute pain caused by gout.

These tophi can damage bone and cartilage, leaving the joints permanently deformed if not treated.

Tophi are swelling lumps around the joints that resemble tree trunk knots. They can affect joints such as the fingers, foot, and knees, as well as the ears. Tophi do not hurt, but the inflammation they create can be excruciating.

Outside of the joints, tophi can occur in connective tissue.

Is it genetic?

Pure Medical - Gout Genetics

Is it genetic?

Gout is caused in part by genetics. SLC2A9 and ABCG2 are two of the thousands of genes linked to gout risk discovered by researchers. The quantity of uric acid the body retains and releases is affected by genes linked to gout.

Gout runs in families due to genetic causes. People who have a gouty parent, sibling, or other close relative are more prone to develop the disease.

Genes are most likely just a catalyst for gout. Environmental factors, such as food, play a role in the disease’s onset.

Is gout a painful condition?

Pure Medical - Gout Pain

Is gout a painful condition?

Yes, gout is a painful condition. In fact, people frequently describe pain in the big toe as one of the initial symptoms. More usual arthritic symptoms, such as swelling and warmth in the joints, accompany the pain.

The degree of gout pain varies. At first, the pain in the big toe might be excruciating. It may diminish to a dull aching after the intense onset.

The discomfort, as well as swelling and other symptoms, are caused by the body’s immune system launching a defence against uric acid crystals in the joints. The release of molecules known as cytokines, which increase severe inflammation, is triggered by this attack.

Gout Summary

Pure Medical - Gout Summary

Gout Summary

Gout may usually be treated and managed satisfactorily. Your GP may recommend drugs to help you minimise inflammation and pain by lowering your uric acid levels.

Changes in your diet may also be recommended by your doctor or dietitian to assist prevent flare-ups. Gout can be successfully managed with a well-balanced diet and healthy lifestyle practices.

Treatment & Therapy Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Gout Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Y Y Kung, C Y Tsai, Y Y Tsai, D F Huang, S T Tsai, C L Yu
NCBI – December 1998 – PMID: 9844782

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Alana Tavares, Iranilda Moha Ross, Lilian de Araujo Pradal, Morgana Neves.
ResearchGate – May  2021 – DOI:10.29273/jmst.2021.5.1.1

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Naomi Schlesinger, Michelle A Detry, Bart K Holland, Daniel G Baker, Anna M Beutler, Marina Rull, Bruce I Hoffman, H Ralph Schumacher Jr
NCBI – Febuary 2002 – PMID: 11838852

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
LIAN-YUN LI and JIA-XIANG NI
NCIB – November 2014 – PMID: 25289033

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
F Soriano, V Campana, M Moya, A Gavotto, J Simes, M Soriano, R Soriano, L Spitale, J Palma
NCIB – April 2006 – PMID: 16706692

disclaimer