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Arthritis Treatment

Arthritis is a disease that can be triggered by an infection, a functional disorder of the immune system or a decrease in metabolism. The main indicator of arthritis is inflammation, characterised by swelling, redness of the skin, a rise in temperature in the area of ​​the pathological process.
THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ARTHRITIS CAN MANIFEST NOT ONLY IN JOINTS BUT ALSO IN VITAL ORGANS CAN BE AT RISK.
In the UK, more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints. Arthritis affects people of all ages, including children.

 

Arthritis is a condition in which the joints become inflamed. It might affect a single joint or a number of joints. There are about one hundred different varieties of arthritis, each with its own set of causes and treatments.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis in the UK affecting nearly 9 million people. Other common types include:

Arthritis symptoms normally occur gradually over time, although they can also appear unexpectedly. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) usually strikes people between the ages of 30 and 50. However, it can impact children, teenagers, and young adults.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is most common around the age of 50 or 60, however, some studies have found radiographic evidence of OA in women in their 40s. Individuals who are overweight are also more likely to suffer from it.

01, Arthritis Mobile

02, Arthritis treatment at pure medical group Mobile

Arthritis Treatment

Arthritis is a disease that can be triggered by an infection, a functional disorder of the immune system or a decrease in metabolism. The main indicator of arthritis is inflammation, characterised by swelling, redness of the skin, a rise in temperature in the area of ​​the pathological process.
The adverse effects of arthritis can manifest not only in joints but also in vital organs can be at risk.

Arthritis Treatment

In the UK, more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints. Arthritis affects people of all ages, including children.

 

Arthritis is a condition in which the joints become inflamed. It might affect a single joint or a number of joints. There are about one hundred different varieties of arthritis, each with its own set of causes and treatments.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis in the UK affecting nearly 9 million people. Other common types include:

Arthritis symptoms normally occur gradually over time, although they can also appear unexpectedly. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) usually strikes people between the ages of 30 and 50. However, it can impact children, teenagers, and young adults.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is most common around the age of 50 or 60, however, some studies have found radiographic evidence of OA in women in their 40s. Individuals who are overweight are also more likely to suffer from it.

What are the symptoms of arthritis?

The most frequent symptoms of arthritis are joint pain, stiffness, and swelling. It’s possible that your symptoms will get worse when you get out of bed in the morning or when you get up after a long period of rest.

Other osteoarthritis symptoms include:
• limited range of motion that sometimes goes away after movement
• clicking or popping with bending
• muscular weakness in the joint area
• buckling or instability of the joint
• fingers with bony growths
• In the knees, there is a grating or scraping sensation.
Other rheumatoid arthritis symptoms include:
• Stiffness in the morning that might persist up to 30 minutes
• more than one joint is impacted
• Symptoms first appear in smaller joints such as the feet and hands.
• Both sides of the body are afflicted by the same joints.
fatigue
• Fever of a mild intensity
• The eyes and mouth are inflamed.
• The heart muscle and blood vessels are inflamed.
• A low number of red blood cells

What are the causes of arthritis?

Arthritis can be brought on by:
• Overuse of a joint causes wear and tear
• Age (OA is most common in adults over age 50)
• Injuries
• Obesity
• Autoimmune Disorders
• Family history (Genes)
• muscle weakness

Osteoarthritis

One of the most frequent types of arthritis is OA, which is caused by normal wear and tear. A joint infection or injury can expedite the natural degradation of cartilage tissue.

 

In your joints, cartilage is a tough but flexible connective tissue. It protects your joints by cushioning the pressure and shock that comes with moving and stressing them. Arthritis is caused by a decline in the typical amount of cartilage tissue.

 

If you have a family history of OA, your chances of developing it are even higher.

Rheumatoid arthritis

The autoimmune disorder RA is another common form of arthritis. It happens when your immune system attacks your body’s tissues, causing inflammation in your joints and other body organs.

 

The synovium, soft tissue in your joints that creates a fluid that nourishes the cartilage and lubricates the joints, is affected by this inflammatory reaction in the joints, eventually destroying both bone and cartilage inside the joint.

 

It’s unclear what causes the immune system’s attacks. However, scientists have uncovered genetic markers that fivefold enhance your chances of acquiring RA.
How is arthritis diagnosed?
If you’re not sure who to see for an arthritis diagnosis, start with your primary care doctor. They’ll do a physical exam to look for fluid around the joints, warm or red joints, and document joint range of motion. If necessary, your doctor can recommend you to a specialist.

 

If you’re having significant symptoms, you might want to see a rheumatologist first. This could result in a quicker diagnosis and treatment.

 

Your doctor can determine what type of arthritis you have by measuring inflammation levels in your blood and aspirating and analysing joint fluids, if present.

 

Antibodies to the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and antinuclear antibody (ANA) are some of the most commonly used diagnostic tests.

 

Imaging scans such as X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans are widely used by doctors to create images of your bones and cartilage. This allows them to rule out other possible reasons for your problems, like bone spurs.
How is arthritis treated?

The main goal of treatment is to lessen the amount of discomfort you’re in while also preventing further joint deterioration. In terms of pain management, you’ll discover what works best for you.

In general, arthritis treatment consists of a combination of:

  • Supplements and drugs
  • Therapy for the body
  • Occupational therapy
  • A nutrient-dense diet
  • Regular physical activity
  • If necessary, weight loss
  • Compresses (both hot and cold)
  • Canes and walkers are examples of mobility aids.

It’s also crucial to improve your joint function. To achieve the best outcomes, your doctor may suggest a combination of therapy options.

Alternative and Complementary therapies
for treating Arthritis patients

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
for arthritis

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces the joint inflammation caused by arthritis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy boosts collagen production, which aids in the repair of cartilage that has been affected by arthritis.

Cryotherapy
for Arthritis

Cryotherapy numbs pain, reduces joint swelling, constricts blood vessels, and block nerve impulses to the affected joint.

Ozone therapy
for arthritis

Inflammation, heat, stiffness, and discomfort are all symptoms of arthritis in the joints (hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, neck, hips, knees, ankles or feet). The goal of treatment is to alleviate these symptoms. Ozone therapy is currently one of the most successful treatments. It aids in the reduction of pain and inflammation, as well as the strengthening of the immune system, both of which are symptoms of arthritis. It also enhances the patient’s quality of life and has no adverse effects.

Red Light Therapy
for Arthritis

Acute inflammation is a natural element of the healing process and an immune system reaction. Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, causes healing delays and can develop into autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. In order to facilitate healing, chronic inflammation must be decreased. According to various studies, red light therapy reduced arthritis-related pain by more than half.

Infrared Sauna therapy
for arthritis

Reducing inflammation is critical in the treatment of arthritis, particularly rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, which are both inflammatory diseases.

The anti-inflammatory effects of infrared sauna therapy have been proven in numerous studies. “A wide spectrum of immune cell investigations have indicated that exposure to infrared light most typically has an anti-inflammatory impact,” according to a large review published in 2019 by experts from Poland.

Pressotherapy
for Arthritis

As your rheumatoid arthritis advances, you may notice a decrease in lymph flow. Joint discomfort develops, joints lose function, and the skin changes colour as a result of tissue swelling. Lymph drainage massage by pressotherapy can help relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in its later stages.
Medications

Arthritis is treated with a variety of medications, including:

  • Analgesics like hydrocodone (Vicodin) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) are good for pain relief but not for reducing inflammation.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) and salicylates, are used to treat inflammation and pain. Because salicylates can thin the blood, they should not be used with other blood thinners.
  • Creams containing menthol or capsaicin. These creams prevent pain signals from being transmitted from your joints.
  • Steroids, such as prednisone, can help reduce inflammation, but they should only be used for short periods of time.
  • Anti-inflammatories and biologics are two types of immunosuppressants. For moderate to severe inflammatory arthritis, such as RA, immunosuppressants and biologics are administered.

Your doctor may prescribe corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic medications (DMARDs) to suppress your immune system if you have RA.

Early in the course of RA, DMARDs and biologics are being prescribed. Methotrexate is currently considered the first-line treatment for cancer.

There are a variety of over-the-counter and prescription drugs available to treat OA.

Vitamins and Supplements

While many vitamins, herbs and supplements advertised for arthritis lack clinical proof and safety data, there are a few nutrients that may be effective. Avocado and soybean unsaponifiables (ASU), for example, may aid with OA symptoms. Inflammation in RA may be reduced by taking fish oil and turmeric supplements.

However, before taking any supplements for arthritis, consult your doctor to ensure that they are safe for you and will not conflict with any prescriptions you are presently taking.

Surgery

It’s possible that you’ll need surgery to replace your joint with an artificial one. Hips and knees are the most usual replacements for this type of surgery.

Your doctor may recommend joint fusion if your arthritis is really severe in your fingers or wrists. The ends of your bones are fused together in this treatment, removing the joint and thus the source of inflammation.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy, which includes exercises to strengthen the muscles surrounding the affected joint, is an important part of arthritis treatment.

Outside of your sessions, your physical therapist will most likely suggest a treatment plan that includes daily movement and exercises that you may do at home. These can all work together to increase mobility and prevent falls by increasing strength, flexibility, and balance.

What lifestyle changes can improve arthritis symptoms?

If you lose any excess weight and maintain a healthy weight, you can lower your risk of developing OA and alleviate symptoms if you already have it.

It’s critical to eat a nutrient-dense diet if you want to lose weight. Inflammation can be reduced by eating a diet rich in antioxidants, such as fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Fish and nuts are two other foods that help to reduce inflammation.

If you have arthritis, you should limit or avoid the following foods:

  • Foods that have been fried
  • Items that have been processed
  • Items made from milk
  • A high meat intake

Research has shown that Gluten antibodies may be detected in persons with RA. A gluten-free diet may help to alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the condition. According to a 2015 study, all persons diagnosed with undifferentiated connective tissue disease should follow a gluten-free diet.

Exercise can help to keep your joints flexible. Swimming is a wonderful type of exercise for those with arthritis since it doesn’t place as much strain on the joints as running or walking does. Staying active is crucial, but listening to your body when it signals that it needs to relax and avoiding overexertion is also as important.

You can attempt the following workouts at home:

  • Neck pain can be relieved by head tilting, neck rotation, and other activities.
  • To relieve pain in your hands, do finger and thumb bends.
  • Leg raises, hamstring stretches, and other simple knee arthritis exercises
Complications

The following are some of the overall risk factors for arthritis:

  • Obesity. Being overweight puts additional stress on weight-bearing joints in the body, such as your knees and hips, which is linked to OA. Losing weight can help you minimise your risk of developing arthritis, as well as assist you to manage it if you already have it.
  • Gender and age. Arthritis is more likely to occur as you get older. In addition, most kinds of arthritis affect women more than males. Gout, on the other hand, is more common among men.
  • Injuries caused by excessive use. Repetitive stress injuries from sports, work, or other activities can raise your risk of getting OA in the affected joint(s) later in life.
  • Your chromosomes. A family history of autoimmune disorders, as well as some hereditary genes, can raise your chances of developing RA and other types of arthritis.
  • Smoking. If you smoke, your risk of developing RA rises, and smoking can exacerbate this autoimmune condition.
Risk factors

If left untreated, arthritic symptoms can increase and have an impact on your daily life. The following are some of the probable side effects of this condition:

  • Mobility is restricted. As your arthritis worsens, you may find it more difficult to walk around. This can disrupt your regular routine and prevent you from engaging in your favourite activities or socialising.

 

  • Weight gain is a possibility. This is due to a reduction in movement and discomfort that prevents you from exercising.

 

  • Metabolic problems are more likely to occur. Overweight people with inflammatory diseases like arthritis are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease.

 

  • Other parts of your body are inflamed. When arthritis is caused by an inflammatory condition, such as RA, inflammation can spread to your skin, eyes, blood vessels, and lungs.

 

  • Falls are a possibility. People with OA are more likely to fall and suffer fractures, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Falls are usually caused by muscle weakness, although dizziness from pain drugs can also cause them.

 

  • The ability to work deteriorates. According to the NHS, around 60% of patients with arthritis are in their working years. Arthritis can make it difficult to move around the workplace or simply transfer from one form of transportation to another.

 

  • Mental health ramifications due to persistent pain, inflammation, and social isolation, arthritis raises the risk of anxiety and depression.
What is the long-term outlook for arthritis sufferers?

While there is no cure for arthritis, the appropriate therapy can help you live a happier, healthier life.

You can make a number of lifestyle adjustments in addition to the therapies your doctor advises to help you manage your arthritis.

Arthritis Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Arthritis Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michelle T Sit, Thomas W Schmidt, Lance D Edmonds, Jason A Kelly, Karen M Sky, Jennifer A Thornton, Antoinette M McNeary-Garvin, Stephen R Thom, John B Slade
NCBI – September 2020 – PMID: 32947434

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Hilary D Wilson, Virginia E Toepfer, Arun K Senapati, Judy R Wilson, Perry N Fuchs
NCBI – December 2007 – PMID: 17690013

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michelle Sit, MD, David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center
24 March 2020 – NLOM – NCT02984943

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Sit, Michelle T. MD*; Schmidt, Thomas W.; Edmonds, Lance D; Kelly, Jason A; Sky, Karen M; Thornton, Jennifer A; McNeary-Garvin, Antoinette M; Thom, Stephen R; Slade, John B
JCR – September 2020 – doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000001540

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Małgorzata Gizińska, Radosław Rutkowski, Wojciech Romanowski, Jacek Lewandowski, and Anna Straburzyńska-Lupa
Biomed Research International – October 2015 – Article ID 409174

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Carol Garcia, Jay Karri, Nicholas A. Zacharias & Alaa Abd-Elsayed
Pain and Therapy – 14 December 2020 – s40122-020-00225-w

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Susan Y. Kwiecien & Malachy P. McHugh
European Journal of Applied Physiology – July 2021 – 121, s00421-021-04683-8

disclaimer

Blood Ozone Therapy
J Clin Diagn Res.
NCIB – September 2017 – PMID: 29207809

disclaimer

Blood Ozone Therapy
Omar Seyam, Noel L. Smith, Inefta Reid, Jason Gandhi, Wendy Jiang, and Sardar Ali Khan
NCIB – July 2018 – PMID: 30319765

disclaimer

Blood Ozone Therapy
Sello Lebohang Manoto, Makwese Johaness Maepa, Shirley Keolebogile Motaung
ScienceDirect- May 2018 – S1319562X16000498

disclaimer

Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Denis J Gendron, Michael R Hamblin
NCIB – July 2019 – PMID: 31265376

disclaimer

Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Michael R Hamblin
NCIB – July 2017 – PMID: 28748217

disclaimer

Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Laura Marinela Ailioaie, and Gerhard Litscher
MDPI – August 2020 – doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186565

disclaimer

Photobiomodulation Therapy
Ana E S Jorge, Lucas O Dantas, Paula R M S Serrão, Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín, Tania F Salvini
BMJ – June 2020 – doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035711

disclaimer

Photobiomodulation Therapy
Michael R Hamblin
Arthritis Research & Therapy – October 2013 – doi.org/10.1186/ar4354

disclaimer

Photobiomodulation Therapy
J Stelian, I Gil, B Habot, M Rosenthal, I Abramovici, N Kutok, A Khahil
NCBI – 1992 – PMID: 1727843

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Fredrikus G J Oosterveld 1, Johannes J Rasker, Mark Floors, Robert Landkroon, Bob van Rennes, Jan Zwijnenberg, Mart A F J van de Laar, Gerard J Koel
NCBI – January 2009 – PMID: 18685882

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Joy Hussain and Marc Cohen
NCBI – April 2018 – PMID: 29849692

disclaimer

What are the symptoms of arthritis?

The most frequent symptoms of arthritis are joint pain, stiffness, and swelling. It’s possible that your symptoms will get worse when you get out of bed in the morning or when you get up after a long period of rest.

Other osteoarthritis symptoms include:
• limited range of motion that sometimes goes away after movement
• clicking or popping with bending
• muscular weakness in the joint area
• buckling or instability of the joint
• fingers with bony growths
• In the knees, there is a grating or scraping sensation.
Other rheumatoid arthritis symptoms include:
• Stiffness in the morning that might persist up to 30 minutes
• more than one joint is impacted
• Symptoms first appear in smaller joints such as the feet and hands.
• Both sides of the body are afflicted by the same joints.
fatigue
• Fever of a mild intensity
• The eyes and mouth are inflamed.
• The heart muscle and blood vessels are inflamed.
• A low number of red blood cells

03, Arthritis - Pure Medical Mobile

What are the causes of arthritis?

Arthritis can be brought on by:
• Overuse of a joint causes wear and tear
• Age (OA is most common in adults over age 50)
• Injuries
• Obesity
• Autoimmune Disorders
• Family history (Genes)
• muscle weakness

Osteoarthritis

One of the most frequent types of arthritis is OA, which is caused by normal wear and tear. A joint infection or injury can expedite the natural degradation of cartilage tissue.

 

In your joints, cartilage is a tough but flexible connective tissue. It protects your joints by cushioning the pressure and shock that comes with moving and stressing them. Arthritis is caused by a decline in the typical amount of cartilage tissue.

 

If you have a family history of OA, your chances of developing it are even higher.

Rheumatoid arthritis

The autoimmune disorder RA is another common form of arthritis. It happens when your immune system attacks your body’s tissues, causing inflammation in your joints and other body organs.

 

The synovium, soft tissue in your joints that creates a fluid that nourishes the cartilage and lubricates the joints, is affected by this inflammatory reaction in the joints, eventually destroying both bone and cartilage inside the joint.

 

It’s unclear what causes the immune system’s attacks. However, scientists have uncovered genetic markers that fivefold enhance your chances of acquiring RA.
How is arthritis diagnosed?
If you’re not sure who to see for an arthritis diagnosis, start with your primary care doctor. They’ll do a physical exam to look for fluid around the joints, warm or red joints, and document joint range of motion. If necessary, your doctor can recommend you to a specialist.

 

If you’re having significant symptoms, you might want to see a rheumatologist first. This could result in a quicker diagnosis and treatment.

 

Your doctor can determine what type of arthritis you have by measuring inflammation levels in your blood and aspirating and analysing joint fluids, if present.

 

Antibodies to the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and antinuclear antibody (ANA) are some of the most commonly used diagnostic tests.

 

Imaging scans such as X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans are widely used by doctors to create images of your bones and cartilage. This allows them to rule out other possible reasons for your problems, like bone spurs.
How is arthritis treated?

The main goal of treatment is to lessen the amount of discomfort you’re in while also preventing further joint deterioration. In terms of pain management, you’ll discover what works best for you.

In general, arthritis treatment consists of a combination of:

  • Supplements and drugs
  • Therapy for the body
  • Occupational therapy
  • A nutrient-dense diet
  • Regular physical activity
  • If necessary, weight loss
  • Compresses (both hot and cold)
  • Canes and walkers are examples of mobility aids.

It’s also crucial to improve your joint function. To achieve the best outcomes, your doctor may suggest a combination of therapy options.

Treatments & therapies Pure Medical use
when treating Arthritis patients

Pure Medical - Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy HBOT - M

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
for arthritis

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces the joint inflammation caused by arthritis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy boosts collagen production, which aids in the repair of cartilage that has been affected by arthritis.

Cryotherapy for Fibromyalgia

Cryotherapy
for Arthritis

Cryotherapy numbs pain, reduces joint swelling, constricts blood vessels, and block nerve impulses to the affected joint.

Pure Medical - Blood Ozone Treatments - M

Ozone therapy
for arthritis

Inflammation, heat, stiffness, and discomfort are all symptoms of arthritis in the joints (hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, neck, hips, knees, ankles or feet). The goal of treatment is to alleviate these symptoms. Ozone therapy is currently one of the most successful treatments. It aids in the reduction of pain and inflammation, as well as the strengthening of the immune system, both of which are symptoms of arthritis. It also enhances the patient’s quality of life and has no adverse effects.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy
for Arthritis

Acute inflammation is a natural element of the healing process and an immune system reaction. Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, causes healing delays and can develop into autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. In order to facilitate healing, chronic inflammation must be decreased. According to various studies, red light therapy reduced arthritis-related pain by more than half.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy
for arthritis

Reducing inflammation is critical in the treatment of arthritis, particularly rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, which are both inflammatory diseases.

The anti-inflammatory effects of infrared sauna therapy have been proven in numerous studies. “A wide spectrum of immune cell investigations have indicated that exposure to infrared light most typically has an anti-inflammatory impact,” according to a large review published in 2019 by experts from Poland.

Compression Therapy 6 - Mobile

Pressotherapy
for Arthritis

As your rheumatoid arthritis advances, you may notice a decrease in lymph flow. Joint discomfort develops, joints lose function, and the skin changes colour as a result of tissue swelling. Lymph drainage massage by pressotherapy can help relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in its later stages.
Medications

Arthritis is treated with a variety of medications, including:

  • Analgesics like hydrocodone (Vicodin) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) are good for pain relief but not for reducing inflammation.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil) and salicylates, are used to treat inflammation and pain. Because salicylates can thin the blood, they should not be used with other blood thinners.
  • Creams containing menthol or capsaicin. These creams prevent pain signals from being transmitted from your joints.
  • Steroids, such as prednisone, can help reduce inflammation, but they should only be used for short periods of time.
  • Anti-inflammatories and biologics are two types of immunosuppressants. For moderate to severe inflammatory arthritis, such as RA, immunosuppressants and biologics are administered.

Your doctor may prescribe corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic medications (DMARDs) to suppress your immune system if you have RA.

Early in the course of RA, DMARDs and biologics are being prescribed. Methotrexate is currently considered the first-line treatment for cancer.

There are a variety of over-the-counter and prescription drugs available to treat OA.

Vitamins and Supplements

While many vitamins, herbs and supplements advertised for arthritis lack clinical proof and safety data, there are a few nutrients that may be effective. Avocado and soybean unsaponifiables (ASU), for example, may aid with OA symptoms. Inflammation in RA may be reduced by taking fish oil and turmeric supplements.

However, before taking any supplements for arthritis, consult your doctor to ensure that they are safe for you and will not conflict with any prescriptions you are presently taking.

Surgery

It’s possible that you’ll need surgery to replace your joint with an artificial one. Hips and knees are the most usual replacements for this type of surgery.

Your doctor may recommend joint fusion if your arthritis is really severe in your fingers or wrists. The ends of your bones are fused together in this treatment, removing the joint and thus the source of inflammation.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy, which includes exercises to strengthen the muscles surrounding the affected joint, is an important part of arthritis treatment.

Outside of your sessions, your physical therapist will most likely suggest a treatment plan that includes daily movement and exercises that you may do at home. These can all work together to increase mobility and prevent falls by increasing strength, flexibility, and balance.

What lifestyle changes can improve arthritis symptoms?

If you lose any excess weight and maintain a healthy weight, you can lower your risk of developing OA and alleviate symptoms if you already have it.

It’s critical to eat a nutrient-dense diet if you want to lose weight. Inflammation can be reduced by eating a diet rich in antioxidants, such as fresh fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Fish and nuts are two other foods that help to reduce inflammation.

If you have arthritis, you should limit or avoid the following foods:

  • Foods that have been fried
  • Items that have been processed
  • Items made from milk
  • A high meat intake

Research has shown that Gluten antibodies may be detected in persons with RA. A gluten-free diet may help to alleviate symptoms and slow the progression of the condition. According to a 2015 study, all persons diagnosed with undifferentiated connective tissue disease should follow a gluten-free diet.

Exercise can help to keep your joints flexible. Swimming is a wonderful type of exercise for those with arthritis since it doesn’t place as much strain on the joints as running or walking does. Staying active is crucial, but listening to your body when it signals that it needs to relax and avoiding overexertion is also as important.

You can attempt the following workouts at home:

  • Neck pain can be relieved by head tilting, neck rotation, and other activities.
  • To relieve pain in your hands, do finger and thumb bends.
  • Leg raises, hamstring stretches, and other simple knee arthritis exercises
Complications

The following are some of the overall risk factors for arthritis:

  • Obesity. Being overweight puts additional stress on weight-bearing joints in the body, such as your knees and hips, which is linked to OA. Losing weight can help you minimise your risk of developing arthritis, as well as assist you to manage it if you already have it.
  • Gender and age. Arthritis is more likely to occur as you get older. In addition, most kinds of arthritis affect women more than males. Gout, on the other hand, is more common among men.
  • Injuries caused by excessive use. Repetitive stress injuries from sports, work, or other activities can raise your risk of getting OA in the affected joint(s) later in life.
  • Your chromosomes. A family history of autoimmune disorders, as well as some hereditary genes, can raise your chances of developing RA and other types of arthritis.
  • Smoking. If you smoke, your risk of developing RA rises, and smoking can exacerbate this autoimmune condition.
Risk factors

If left untreated, arthritic symptoms can increase and have an impact on your daily life. The following are some of the probable side effects of this condition:

  • Mobility is restricted. As your arthritis worsens, you may find it more difficult to walk around. This can disrupt your regular routine and prevent you from engaging in your favourite activities or socialising.

 

  • Weight gain is a possibility. This is due to a reduction in movement and discomfort that prevents you from exercising.

 

  • Metabolic problems are more likely to occur. Overweight people with inflammatory diseases like arthritis are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart disease.

 

  • Other parts of your body are inflamed. When arthritis is caused by an inflammatory condition, such as RA, inflammation can spread to your skin, eyes, blood vessels, and lungs.

 

  • Falls are a possibility. People with OA are more likely to fall and suffer fractures, according to the Arthritis Foundation. Falls are usually caused by muscle weakness, although dizziness from pain drugs can also cause them.

 

  • The ability to work deteriorates. According to the NHS, around 60% of patients with arthritis are in their working years. Arthritis can make it difficult to move around the workplace or simply transfer from one form of transportation to another.

 

  • Mental health ramifications due to persistent pain, inflammation, and social isolation, arthritis raises the risk of anxiety and depression.
What is the long-term outlook for arthritis sufferers?

While there is no cure for arthritis, the appropriate therapy can help you live a happier, healthier life.

You can make a number of lifestyle adjustments in addition to the therapies your doctor advises to help you manage your arthritis.

Arthritis Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Arthritis Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michelle T Sit, Thomas W Schmidt, Lance D Edmonds, Jason A Kelly, Karen M Sky, Jennifer A Thornton, Antoinette M McNeary-Garvin, Stephen R Thom, John B Slade
NCBI – September 2020 – PMID: 32947434

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Hilary D Wilson, Virginia E Toepfer, Arun K Senapati, Judy R Wilson, Perry N Fuchs
NCBI – December 2007 – PMID: 17690013

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michelle Sit, MD, David Grant U.S. Air Force Medical Center
24 March 2020 – NLOM – NCT02984943

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Sit, Michelle T. MD*; Schmidt, Thomas W.; Edmonds, Lance D; Kelly, Jason A; Sky, Karen M; Thornton, Jennifer A; McNeary-Garvin, Antoinette M; Thom, Stephen R; Slade, John B
JCR – September 2020 – doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000001540

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Małgorzata Gizińska, Radosław Rutkowski, Wojciech Romanowski, Jacek Lewandowski, and Anna Straburzyńska-Lupa
Biomed Research International – October 2015 – Article ID 409174

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Carol Garcia, Jay Karri, Nicholas A. Zacharias & Alaa Abd-Elsayed
Pain and Therapy – 14 December 2020 – s40122-020-00225-w

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Susan Y. Kwiecien & Malachy P. McHugh
European Journal of Applied Physiology – July 2021 – 121, s00421-021-04683-8

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Blood Ozone Therapy
J Clin Diagn Res.
NCIB – September 2017 – PMID: 29207809

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Blood Ozone Therapy
Omar Seyam, Noel L. Smith, Inefta Reid, Jason Gandhi, Wendy Jiang, and Sardar Ali Khan
NCIB – July 2018 – PMID: 30319765

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Blood Ozone Therapy
Sello Lebohang Manoto, Makwese Johaness Maepa, Shirley Keolebogile Motaung
ScienceDirect- May 2018 – S1319562X16000498

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Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Denis J Gendron, Michael R Hamblin
NCIB – July 2019 – PMID: 31265376

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Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Michael R Hamblin
NCIB – July 2017 – PMID: 28748217

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Photo-biomodulation Therapy
Laura Marinela Ailioaie, and Gerhard Litscher
MDPI – August 2020 – doi.org/10.3390/ijms21186565

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Photobiomodulation Therapy
Ana E S Jorge, Lucas O Dantas, Paula R M S Serrão, Francisco Alburquerque-Sendín, Tania F Salvini
BMJ – June 2020 – doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035711

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Photobiomodulation Therapy
Michael R Hamblin
Arthritis Research & Therapy – October 2013 – doi.org/10.1186/ar4354

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Photobiomodulation Therapy
J Stelian, I Gil, B Habot, M Rosenthal, I Abramovici, N Kutok, A Khahil
NCBI – 1992 – PMID: 1727843

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Infrared Sauna Therapy
Fredrikus G J Oosterveld 1, Johannes J Rasker, Mark Floors, Robert Landkroon, Bob van Rennes, Jan Zwijnenberg, Mart A F J van de Laar, Gerard J Koel
NCBI – January 2009 – PMID: 18685882

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Infrared Sauna Therapy
Joy Hussain and Marc Cohen
NCBI – April 2018 – PMID: 29849692

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