LYME DISEASE
TREATMENT & THERAPY

In many parts of the world, including the UK, USA, Europe, and Asia, Lyme Disease is the most common tick-borne sickness. It’s also one of the most difficult to treat, with many patients finding no relief from conventional antibiotic therapies.

What is Lyme disease?

Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease, which is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia. A bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick transmits B. burgdorferi to humans. After feeding on infected deer, birds, or mice, the tick gets infected.

 

To transmit the infection, a tick must be on the skin for at least 36 hours. Many patients who have Lyme disease have no recollection of being bitten by a tick.

 

Lyme disease was initially discovered in 1975 in the Connecticut village of Old Lyme. In Europe and the United States, it’s the most frequent tick-borne infection.

 

People who live or spend time in woodland areas where the disease is spread are more prone to contract it. People who visit woodland regions with domesticated animals are also at an increased risk of contracting Lyme disease.
Pure Restore Health

Symptoms of Lyme disease

Lyme disease affects everyone differently, and the severity of the symptoms varies. Symptoms can overlap even though Lyme disease is usually classified into three stages:
Early localised
Erythema migrans (bullseye Rash), fever and flu-like symptoms, fatigue, trouble sleeping, swollen lymph nodes, joint pain and muscle aches.

 

Early disseminated
Additional rashes, flu-like symptoms, swollen lymph nodes.

 

Late disseminated.
Rapid or irregular heartbeat, arthritis with visible swollen joints (usually the knees), bell’s palsy, headaches, poor memory, peripheral neuropathy.

 

Some patients will appear with signs of the disease at a later stage without having symptoms of the disease at an earlier stage.
Pure Relieves Pain

Treatment of Lyme disease

Lyme disease is best treated when it is caught early. To remove the infection, a short 10- to 14-day course of oral antibiotics is used to treat early localised illness.

 

Medications used to treat Lyme disease include:
– Doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime, which are first-line treatments in adults and children
– Cefuroxime and amoxicillin, which are used to treat women who are nursing or breastfeeding

 

Some kinds of Lyme disease, such as those involving the heart or the central nervous system (CNS), are treated with intravenous (IV) antibiotics.

 

Healthcare practitioners will often convert to an oral regimen after the patient has improved and the treatment course has been completed. The treatment normally takes 14–28 days to complete.

 

Oral antibiotics are used to treat Lyme arthritis, a late-stage symptom of Lyme disease that can occur in some patients.

 

If you’re treated for Lyme disease with antibiotics but continue to experience symptoms, it is referred to as post Lyme disease syndrome or post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.

 

According to a 2016 research published in the New England Journal of Medicine, this syndrome affects 10 to 20% of persons with Lyme disease. The cause for this is unknown.

 

Your mobility and cognitive abilities may be harmed by post-Lyme illness syndrome. Pure Medical specialise in the treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome with a goal of treatment reducing pain and suffering. The majority of patients recover, but without Pure Medicals tertiary care it can take months or years for them to do so.

Pure Medicals Lyme disease Treatment

Pure Eases Suffering

Is Lyme disease contagious?

There is no indication that Lyme disease is spread from person to person. Pregnant women cannot transfer the sickness to their foetus through breast milk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

Lyme disease is a bacteria-borne ailment spread by blacklegged deer ticks. Although these bacteria are found in human fluids, there is no evidence that Lyme disease may be shared by sneezing, coughing, or kissing.

 

Lyme disease cannot be spread sexually or through a blood transfusion, according to research.
Pure Reduces Inflammation

Lyme diagnosis

Lyme disease is diagnosed by reviewing your medical history, which includes looking for tick bites or living in an endemic area.
A physical exam will be performed by your healthcare practitioner to check for the presence of a rash or other Lyme symptoms.
Testing during the early stages of a localised infection is not advised.
Blood tests are most reliable a few weeks after the initial infection when antibodies are present. Your healthcare provider may order the following tests:
  • Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used to detect antibodies against B. burgdorferi.
  • Western blot is used to confirm a positive ELISA test. It checks for the presence of antibodies to specific B. burgdorferi proteins.
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to evaluate people with persistent Lyme arthritis or nervous system symptoms. It is performed on joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PCR testing on CSF for diagnosis of Lyme is not routinely recommended due to low sensitivity. A negative test doesn’t rule out the diagnosis. In contrast, most people will have positive PCR results in joint fluid if tested prior to antibiotic therapy.

Lyme Disease Treatment
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Lyme treatment scientific case studies.
Additional symptom-specific case studies can be found on individual treatment pages.
Joanna Ścieszka, Józefa Dąbek, Paweł Cieślik
Diseases & Conditions. April 2015 PMID: 27407225

disclaimer

Chien-Yu Huang, Yen-Wen Chen, Tseng-Hui Kao, Hsin-Kuo Kao, Yu-Chin Lee, Jui-Chun Cheng, Jia-Horng Wang
Diseases & Conditions. April 2014. PMID: 24726678

disclaimer

Sheila L. Arvikar, Allen C. Steere
Diseases & Conditions. June 2015. PMID: 25999223 

disclaimer

Michael T. Melia, Paul G. Auwaerter.
Diseases & Conditions. March 2016. N Engl J Med 2016; 374:1277-1278

disclaimer

Robert Jay Rowen
Diseases & Conditions. September 2018. PMID:30319768

disclaimer

Dean Nardelli, Janis Eells, Jeri-Anne Lyons, Jennifer Doll
Diseases & Conditions. The University Of Wisconsin. May 2015

disclaimer

Lyme Disease Bite Mobile

LYME DISEASE
TREATMENT & THERAPY

In many parts of the world, including the UK, USA, Europe, and Asia, Lyme Disease is the most common tick-borne sickness. It’s also one of the most difficult to treat, with many patients finding no relief from conventional antibiotic therapies.

What is Lyme disease?

Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease, which is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia. A bite from an infected black-legged or deer tick transmits B. burgdorferi to humans. After feeding on infected deer, birds, or mice, the tick gets infected.

 

To transmit the infection, a tick must be on the skin for at least 36 hours. Many patients who have Lyme disease have no recollection of being bitten by a tick.

 

Lyme disease was initially discovered in 1975 in the Connecticut village of Old Lyme. In Europe and the United States, it’s the most frequent tick-borne infection.

 

People who live or spend time in woodland areas where the disease is spread are more prone to contract it. People who visit woodland regions with domesticated animals are also at an increased risk of contracting Lyme disease.

Lyme Disease Fatigue Mobile

Pure Restore Health

Symptoms of Lyme disease

Lyme disease affects everyone differently, and the severity of the symptoms varies. Symptoms can overlap even though Lyme disease is usually classified into three stages:
Early localised
Erythema migrans (bullseye Rash), fever and flu-like symptoms, fatigue, trouble sleeping, swollen lymph nodes, joint pain and muscle aches.

 

Early disseminated
Additional rashes, flu-like symptoms, swollen lymph nodes.

 

Late disseminated.
Rapid or irregular heartbeat, arthritis with visible swollen joints (usually the knees), bell’s palsy, headaches, poor memory, peripheral neuropathy.

 

Some patients will appear with signs of the disease at a later stage without having symptoms of the disease at an earlier stage.
Pure Relieves Pain

Treatment of Lyme disease

Lyme disease is best treated when it is caught early. To remove the infection, a short 10- to 14-day course of oral antibiotics is used to treat early localised illness.

 

Medications used to treat Lyme disease include:
– Doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime, which are first-line treatments in adults and children
– Cefuroxime and amoxicillin, which are used to treat women who are nursing or breastfeeding

 

Some kinds of Lyme disease, such as those involving the heart or the central nervous system (CNS), are treated with intravenous (IV) antibiotics.

 

Healthcare practitioners will often convert to an oral regimen after the patient has improved and the treatment course has been completed. The treatment normally takes 14–28 days to complete.

 

Oral antibiotics are used to treat Lyme arthritis, a late-stage symptom of Lyme disease that can occur in some patients.

 

If you’re treated for Lyme disease with antibiotics but continue to experience symptoms, it is referred to as post Lyme disease syndrome or post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.

 

According to a 2016 research published in the New England Journal of Medicine, this syndrome affects 10 to 20% of persons with Lyme disease. The cause for this is unknown.

 

Your mobility and cognitive abilities may be harmed by post-Lyme illness syndrome. Pure Medical specialise in the treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome with a goal of treatment reducing pain and suffering. The majority of patients recover, but without Pure Medicals tertiary care it can take months or years for them to do so.

Pure Medicals Lyme disease Treatment

Pure Eases Suffering

Is Lyme disease contagious?

There is no indication that Lyme disease is spread from person to person. Pregnant women cannot transfer the sickness to their foetus through breast milk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

Lyme disease is a bacteria-borne ailment spread by blacklegged deer ticks. Although these bacteria are found in human fluids, there is no evidence that Lyme disease may be shared by sneezing, coughing, or kissing.

 

Lyme disease cannot be spread sexually or through a blood transfusion, according to research.
Pure Reduces Inflammation

Lyme diagnosis

Lyme disease is diagnosed by reviewing your medical history, which includes looking for tick bites or living in an endemic area.
A physical exam will be performed by your healthcare practitioner to check for the presence of a rash or other Lyme symptoms.
Testing during the early stages of a localised infection is not advised.
Blood tests are most reliable a few weeks after the initial infection when antibodies are present. Your healthcare provider may order the following tests:
  • Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used to detect antibodies against B. burgdorferi.
  • Western blot is used to confirm a positive ELISA test. It checks for the presence of antibodies to specific B. burgdorferi proteins.
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is used to evaluate people with persistent Lyme arthritis or nervous system symptoms. It is performed on joint fluid or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). PCR testing on CSF for diagnosis of Lyme is not routinely recommended due to low sensitivity. A negative test doesn’t rule out the diagnosis. In contrast, most people will have positive PCR results in joint fluid if tested prior to antibiotic therapy.

Lyme Disease Treatment
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Lyme treatment scientific case studies.
Additional symptom-specific case studies can be found on individual treatment pages.
Joanna Ścieszka, Józefa Dąbek, Paweł Cieślik
Diseases & Conditions. April 2015 PMID: 27407225

disclaimer

Chien-Yu Huang, Yen-Wen Chen, Tseng-Hui Kao, Hsin-Kuo Kao, Yu-Chin Lee, Jui-Chun Cheng, Jia-Horng Wang
Diseases & Conditions. April 2014. PMID: 24726678

disclaimer

Sheila L. Arvikar, Allen C. Steere
Diseases & Conditions. June 2015. PMID: 25999223 

disclaimer

Michael T. Melia, Paul G. Auwaerter.
Diseases & Conditions. March 2016. N Engl J Med 2016; 374:1277-1278

disclaimer

Robert Jay Rowen
Diseases & Conditions. September 2018. PMID:30319768

disclaimer

Dean Nardelli, Janis Eells, Jeri-Anne Lyons, Jennifer Doll
Diseases & Conditions. The University Of Wisconsin. May 2015

disclaimer