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Everything You Need to Know About Fibromyalgia

A CONDITION THAT CAUSES WIDESPREAD PAIN AND EXTREME TIREDNESS

Fibromyalgia is a chronic (long-term) illness. It has the following effects:

  • Musculoskeletal pain in the muscles and bones
  • Areas of tenderness
  • Fatigue
  • Cognitive & sleep disturbances

Even for healthcare professionals, this disease might be hard to decipher. Its symptoms are similar to those of other illnesses, and there are no specific tests available to establish the diagnosis. Fibromyalgia is frequently misdiagnosed as a result of this.

Some medical professionals even questioned if fibromyalgia was real in the past. It’s a lot better understood now. Some of the stigma attached to it has dissipated.

Fibromyalgia can still be difficult to manage. Medications, counselling, and lifestyle modifications, on the other hand, can assist you in managing your symptoms and improving your overall quality of life.

Everything You Need
to Know About Fibromyalgia

A condition that causes widespread pain and extreme tiredness

Fibromyalgia is a chronic (long-term) illness. It has the following effects:

  • Musculoskeletal pain in the muscles and bones
  • Areas of tenderness
  • Fatigue
  • Cognitive & sleep disturbances

Even for healthcare professionals, this disease might be hard to decipher. Its symptoms are similar to those of other illnesses, and there are no specific tests available to establish the diagnosis. Fibromyalgia is frequently misdiagnosed as a result of this.

Some medical professionals even questioned if fibromyalgia was real in the past. It’s a lot better understood now. Some of the stigma attached to it has dissipated.

Fibromyalgia can still be difficult to manage. Medications, counselling, and lifestyle modifications, on the other hand, can assist you in managing your symptoms and improving your overall quality of life.

Sex and gender exist on a spectrum. This article uses the terms “male” and “female” to refer to sex assigned at birth.
Learn more about sex and gender.
Fibromyalgia Symptoms
Fibromyalgia causes what is now known as “pain regions.” Some of these places overlap with “trigger points” or “sensitive points,” which were previously referred to as tender spots. However, several of the previously mentioned tender spots have been left out.

The discomfort in these areas is a dull aching that persists. If you’ve had musculoskeletal pain in four of the five pain zones listed in the 2016 revisions to the fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria, your healthcare provider will evaluate a diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

The term “multisite pain” refers to this diagnostic procedure. In contrast, the 1990 fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria definition for “chronic broad pain” was “chronic extensive pain.”

Instead of focusing on pain length, which was formerly the key criteria for a fibromyalgia diagnosis, this approach of diagnosis focuses on the locations of musculoskeletal discomfort and degree of pain.
Other fibromyalgia symptoms include:
Fatigue
• Problems sleeping
• Long stretches of time spent sleeping without feeling rested (nonrestorative sleep)
• Headaches
• Depression
• Anxiety
• Difficulty concentrating or paying attention
• A dull aching or soreness in the lower belly
• Eyes that are dry
• Bladder problems, like interstitial cystitis
The brain and nerves in patients with fibromyalgia may misinterpret or overreact to regular pain signals. This could be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain or a dorsal root ganglion malfunction that affects central pain (brain) sensitivity.
Fibromyalgia can also have an impact on your mood and energy level.
Fibromyalgia Fog
Fibromyalgia fog, often known as “fibro fog” or “brain fog,” is a term used by some people to describe the hazy feeling they have when they have fibromyalgia. The following are symptoms of fibro fog:
  • Memory lapses
  • Difficulties concentrating
  • Trouble staying alert
According to a 2015 study published in Rheumatology International, some persons find fibromyalgia’s mental fogginess more distressing than the pain.
Symptoms of
Fibromyalgia in women
Symptoms of fibromyalgia have been found to be more severe in women than in men. Pain, IBS symptoms, and morning fatigue are all more common in women than in men. Period pain is also very prevalent.
However, when the 2016 revisions to the diagnostic criteria were applied, more women than men are diagnosed with fibromyalgia, potentially reducing the degree of difference in pain levels experienced by males and females. To better evaluate that distinction, more research is needed.
The onset of menopause may exacerbate fibromyalgia symptoms. The fact that certain symptoms of menopause and fibromyalgia are nearly identical adds to the confusion.

Symptoms of
Fibromyalgia in men

Fibromyalgia affects both men and women. Despite this, they may go undiagnosed because it is thought to be mostly a feminine disease. However, as the 2016 diagnostic protocol becomes more widely used, statistics suggest that more men are being diagnosed.
The idea that males who are in pain should “toughen up” contributes to the stigma and difficulty in getting diagnosed. Males who go to the doctor may suffer embarrassment and the possibility that their issues may not be treated seriously.
Trigger points for Fibromyalgia

People were previously diagnosed with fibromyalgia if they had widespread pain and discomfort in at least 11 of 18 specified trigger points throughout their bodies. By pushing forcefully on these locations, healthcare experts could determine how many of them were painful.

Common trigger points included the:

  • The back of the head
  • The top of the shoulders
  • The upper chest
  • The hips
  • The knees
  • The outter elbows

Trigger points, for the most part, are no longer used in the diagnostic procedure.

Instead, if you have pain in four of the five regions of discomfort as specified by the 2016 revised diagnostic criteria, and you have no other diagnosable medical illness that could explain the pain, healthcare practitioners may diagnose fibromyalgia.

Pain experienced when suffering from Fibromyalgia

The most common fibromyalgia symptom is pain. It will be felt in various muscles and soft tissues throughout your body.

The discomfort might range from a moderate ache to a severe and almost intolerable ache. Its severity may influence how well you cope on a daily basis.

Fibromyalgia appears to be caused by a malfunctioning neural system. Things that should not be painful cause your body to overreact. You may also have discomfort in multiple areas of your body.

However, current research cannot determine a specific cause for fibromyalgia. The goal of the research is to better understand this illness and its cause.

Chest Pain

The pain of fibromyalgia in the chest can be shockingly similar to that of a heart attack.

The cartilage that links your ribs to your breastbone is the source of chest pain in fibromyalgia. It’s possible that the ache will spread to your shoulders and arms.

Chest discomfort from fibromyalgia can feel like this:

  • Sharp
  • Stabbing
  • A burning sensation
  • It can cause you to fight to catch your breath, just like a heart attack
Back Pain

One of the most typical places to experience pain is in your back. Low back pain affects the majority of people at some point in their lives. If your back hurts, it’s not always clear if it’s fibromyalgia or something else, like arthritis or a strained muscle.

Other signs and symptoms, including fatigue and brain fog, can help you figure out if you have fibromyalgia. It’s also possible to have fibromyalgia and arthritis at the same time.

Back pain can be relieved with the same drugs that help with other fibromyalgia symptoms. Stretching and strengthening activities can aid in the support of your back’s muscles and soft tissues.

Leg Pain

Fibromyalgia pain can also be felt in the muscles and soft tissues of your legs. Leg pain can resemble the discomfort of a strained muscle or the stiffness associated with arthritis. It could be:

  • Deep
  • Burning
  • Throbbing

Fibromyalgia in the legs can cause numbness or tingle in the legs. A “creepy, creeping” sensation may occur. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which can overlap with fibromyalgia, is characterised by an overwhelming urge to move your legs.

Leg fatigue is a common symptom of fatigue. Your limbs may feel heavy, as if they’re being weighed down.

What causes Fibromyalgia?

The source of fibromyalgia is unknown to medical professionals and researchers.

According to the most recent study, the explanation appears to be a multiple-hit theory involving genetic disposition (hereditary features) in combination with a trigger, or a collection of triggers, such as infection, trauma, and stress.

Let’s take a closer look at these and other factors that could play a role in why people get fibromyalgia.

Infections

Fibromyalgia can be triggered or made worse by a previous disease. The flu, pneumonia, gastrointestinal diseases like Salmonella and Shigella bacteria, and the Epstein-Barr virus are all linked to fibromyalgia.

Genes

Fibromyalgia is a disease that typically runs in families. You’re more likely to have this ailment if you have a family member who has it.

Certain gene mutations, according to researchers, may have a role. They’ve discovered a few genes that may influence the passage of chemical pain signals between nerve cells.

Trauma

Fibromyalgia can occur in those who have had serious physical or emotional stress. Post-traumatic stress disorder has been connected to the syndrome (PTSD).

Stress

Stress, like trauma, can have long-term consequences on your body. Stress has been linked to hormonal changes that may play a role in fibromyalgia development.

Healthcare professionals aren’t sure what causes fibromyalgia pain to be chronic and widespread. The brain, according to one idea, decreases the pain threshold. Over time, sensations that were not terrible previously become extremely severe.

Another theory is that pain impulses cause the nerves to overreact. They grow more sensitive to the point of causing unneeded or exaggerated pain.

Autoimmunity and Fibromyalgia

The body incorrectly targets its own tissues with proteins called autoantibodies in autoimmune illnesses including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The immune system assaults the joints or other healthy tissues instead of viruses or germs, as it would normally.

The symptoms of fibromyalgia are quite similar to those of autoimmune illnesses. Because of these symptom commonalities, it’s been suggested that fibromyalgia is an autoimmune disease.

Because fibromyalgia does not produce inflammation and reproducing autoantibodies have yet to be discovered, this claim has been difficult to confirm.

It’s conceivable to have fibromyalgia and an autoimmune condition at the same time.

Risk factors of Fibromyalgia

Flare-ups of fibromyalgia can be caused by:

  • Stress
  • Injury
  • Flu or illness

The brain and neurological system may misinterpret or overreact to normal pain signals due to a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Other factors that contribute to the development of fibromyalgia include:

Gender – Women are currently diagnosed with the majority of fibromyalgia patients, while the explanation for this gap is unknown.

Age – You’re most likely to be diagnosed while you’re in your thirties and forties, and your chances of being diagnosed rise as you get older. Fibromyalgia can affect youngsters as well.

Family history – You may be at a greater risk of developing fibromyalgia if you have close relatives who have it.

Disease – Although fibromyalgia is not a type of arthritis, having lupus or RA increases your chances of developing it.

Diagnosing Fibromyalgia

If you’ve had widespread discomfort for three months or longer, your doctor may diagnose you with fibromyalgia. The term “widespread” refers to the discomfort that affects both sides of your body and is felt above and below the waist.

Your healthcare practitioner must establish that no other condition is causing your pain after a thorough examination.

Fibromyalgia cannot be detected by a lab test or an imaging scan. These tests may be used by your healthcare provider to rule out other possible reasons for your chronic pain.

Because the symptoms of fibromyalgia and autoimmune disorders often overlap, it can be difficult for doctors to tell the two apart. Fibromyalgia and autoimmune illnesses like Sjogren’s syndrome have been linked in several studies.

Fibromyalgia Treatment

There is currently no cure for fibromyalgia.

Instead, treatment focuses on reducing symptoms and enhancing the quality of life by implementing the following strategies:

  • Medications
  • Self-care strategies
  • Lifestyle changes

Medications can help you sleep better and decrease pain. Physical and occupational therapy increase your strength and minimises your body’s stress. Both mentally and physically, exercise and stress-reduction measures can help you feel better.

You may also want to seek out assistance and advice. Seeing a therapist or joining a support group may be necessary.

Alternative and Complementary therapies
for treating Fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) has been cited in a number of recent studies to significantly improve the symptoms and quality of life, as well as brain function of patients with fibromyalgia.

Ozone Therapy
For Fibromyalgia

Because the actual physiological mechanism that causes fibromyalgia has yet to be discovered, treatment focuses primarily on symptom management. While this method may provide temporary relief, it is ineffective in restoring your quality of life in the long run.

After researching fibromyalgia and the therapies available, we discovered that ozone therapy holds a lot of potential in terms of long-term effects.

Ozone therapy, also known as major ozonated autohemotherapy, is a procedure in which ozone gas is introduced into your body to help balance the free radicals and antioxidants in your system. This extra oxygen not only kills infections but also regulates your metabolic system and improves circulation, making you more capable of cellular healing.

To put the success of this treatment into perspective, one research of 65 fibromyalgia patients revealed that after ozone therapy, 70% of patients reported considerable improvement (almost 50%) in their symptoms.

Red Light Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Studies found that red light therapy for fibromyalgia led to significant improvements in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores, stiffness, pain severity, number of tender points, depression and anxiety, compared to placebo treatment.

Infrared Sauna Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Thermal therapy has long been used to alleviate the symptoms of Fibromyalgia. Research now shows that regular heat therapy using Infrared sauna therapy can have a very positive effect on this condition, contributing to lower levels of pain and overall higher quality of life for those affected by the disorder.

Cryotherapy
for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia patients live with debilitating pain and exhaustion on a daily basis. Chronic muscle pain and stiffness, severe fatigue and diminished energy, insomnia, memory problems, migraines, reduced tolerance to exercise, and many other debilitating symptoms are all hallmarks of this incurable condition.
Regular combined treatments and therapies including whole-body cryotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, ozone therapy, red light therapy and infrared sauna therapy have been successfully demonstrated in studies to dramatically alleviate fibromyalgia symptoms and have been successfully used to treat fibromyalgia in many European countries.
The treatments have helped with the following fibromyalgia symptoms:
  • Pain and pain memory
  • Disrupted muscle relaxation and an increased tendency for muscular fatigue
  • Restrictions in the mobility of joints as a result of muscle fatigue
  • Sleep disorders
  • Depressive moods
  • Orthostatic regulatory disruption
  • Organic causes with secondary fibromyalgia (when fibromyalgia occurs as a result of another disease), also spinal diseases, inflammatory-rheumatic diseases and psoriasis.
Medication for Fibromyalgia
The goal of fibromyalgia treatment is to manage pain and improve quality of life. This is often accomplished through a two-pronged approach of self-care and medication.

 

Common medications for fibromyalgia include:

Pain relievers

Mild discomfort can be relieved with over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

Previously, narcotics such as tramadol, an opioid, were administered for pain management. However, research has shown that they are ineffective. Furthermore, the dosage of narcotics is frequently increased rapidly, posing a health risk to those who are administered these prescriptions.

The majority of doctors advise against using drugs to treat fibromyalgia.

Antidepressants

Antidepressants such as duloxetine and milnacipran HCL are sometimes used to relieve fibromyalgia pain and fatigue. These drugs may also aid with sleep quality and neurotransmitter balance.

Antiseizure drugs

Gabapentin was developed to treat epilepsy, but it may also assist people with fibromyalgia to manage their symptoms. Another anti-seizure medicine, pregabalin, was the first approved treatment for fibromyalgia. It prevents nerve cells from transmitting pain signals.

Antidepressants and sleep aids are two medicines that aren’t approved to treat fibromyalgia but can help with symptoms. Muscle relaxants, which were once popular, are now discouraged.

Researchers are also looking into a few experimental treatments that could one-day aid people with fibromyalgia.

Natural Fibromyalgia remedies

You might explore alternatives if the medications prescribed by your doctor don’t completely treat your fibromyalgia symptoms. Many natural remedies aim to alleviate tension and discomfort. They can be used on their own or in conjunction with established medical therapies.

Natural fibromyalgia treatments include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Acupuncture
  • Meditation
  • Yoga (use with caution if hypermobility is present)
  • Tai chi
  • Exercise
  • Massage therapy
  • A balanced, healthy diet

The stress that causes fibromyalgia symptoms and depression can be reduced with the therapy. Group therapy may be the most cost-effective alternative, and it will allow you to meet others who are dealing with similar problems.

Another approach for dealing with stressful conditions is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). If you prefer one-on-one assistance, individual treatment is also accessible.

It’s vital to keep in mind that most alternative fibromyalgia treatments haven’t been properly researched or confirmed to be helpful. Before you attempt any of these therapies, talk to your doctor about the benefits and dangers.

 

Fibromyalgia recommended diet

Some people claim that following a certain diet plan or avoiding certain foods makes them feel better. However, no single diet has been proven to help fibromyalgia symptoms.

If you have fibromyalgia, make an effort to eat a well-balanced diet. Nutrition is critical in keeping your body healthy, preventing symptoms from worsening, and providing you with a steady amount of energy.

Keep these dietary tips in mind:

  • Eat fruits and vegetables, along with whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Eat more plants than meat.
  • Reduce the amount of sugar in your diet.
  • Exercise as often as you can.
  • Work toward achieving and maintaining your healthy weight.

Certain foods, such as gluten and MSG, may aggravate your symptoms. Keep a food journal where you monitor what you eat and how you feel after each meal if this is the case.

Give your healthcare provider a copy of this diary. They can help you figure out which meals make your symptoms worse. It may be useful to avoid these foods in order to better manage your symptoms.

Pain Relief for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia pain might be inconvenient and persistent enough to disrupt your everyday activities. Don’t just accept suffering. Consult your healthcare provider for advice on how to deal with it.

One possibility is to take pain medications such as:

  • Aspirin
  • Ibuprofen
  • Naproxen sodium

These medications can:

  • help with discomfort
  • lower pain levels
  • help manage your condition

These drugs help to reduce inflammation. Though inflammation isn’t a main feature of fibromyalgia, it may coexist with RA or another disorder. Pain medicines may help you get a better night’s sleep.

Please keep in mind that NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines) do have adverse effects. If NSAIDs are used over an extended period of time, as is often the case in the treatment of chronic pain, caution is suggested.

Consult your healthcare provider to develop a safe treatment plan that will assist you in managing your condition.

Antidepressants and anti-seizure medications are two more types of medications that your doctor may prescribe to help you manage your pain. Yoga, acupuncture and physical therapy can all aid with fibromyalgia pain relief.

Fatigue from fibromyalgia can be just as difficult to manage as pain. Learn how to improve your sleeping habits.

Living with fibromyalgia

When you live with pain, exhaustion, and other symptoms on a regular basis, your quality of life can suffer. Many individuals have misconceptions about fibromyalgia, which makes matters even more complicated. It’s easy for those around you to dismiss your agony as fictitious because your symptoms are difficult to observe.

Recognise that your situation is genuine. Maintain your determination to find a treatment that works for you. Before you start to feel better, you may need to attempt more than one therapy or combine a few strategies.

Lean on those that are familiar with your situation, such as:
• Your healthcare professional
• Close friends and family
• a therapist

Be easy on yourself. Make sure you don’t overdo it. Above all, believe in your ability to cope with and manage your disease.

Summary

Fibromyalgia is a long-term illness that causes:

  • Widespread pain
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Depression

There is currently no cure, and researchers aren’t sure what causes it. Medications and lifestyle adjustments are used to assist alleviate the symptoms.

Fibromyalgia has been diagnosed in approximately 2 million people in the UK aged 18 and up. The majority of fibromyalgia cases are diagnosed in women, although it can also affect men and children. The majority of persons are diagnosed in their thirties, forties or fifties.

Fibromyalgia is a long-term (chronic) condition. However, some people may go into remission, where their pain and exhaustion go away.

Fibromyalgia Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Fibromyalgia Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
K Curtis, J Katz, C Djaiani, G O’Leary, J Uehling, J Carroll, D Santa Mina, H Clarke, M Gofeld, R Katznelson
NCBI – June 2021 – PMID: 33594439

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Fabiola Atzeni, Roberto Casale, Alessandra Alciati, Ignazio Francesco Masala, Alberto Batticciotto, Rossella Talotta, Maria Chiara Gerardi, Fausto Salaffi, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini
NCBI – February 2019 – PMID: 30747099

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
M. Muratore, L. Quarta, P. Sarzi Puttini, C. Cosentino, A. Grimaldi, E. Quarta
BMJ – June 2018 – DOI: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-eular.6767

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
U Tirelli, C Cirrito, M Pavanello, C Piasentin, A Lleshi, R Taibi
NCBI – February 2019 – PMID: 30840304

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Serguei Borisovich Kisselev and Sergey Vladimirovich Moskvin
NCBI – December 2018 – PMID: 31360363

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Shu-Wei Yeh, Chien-Hsiung Hong, Ming-Chieh Shih, Ka-Wai Tam, Yao-Hsien Huang, Yi-Chun Kuan
PubMed – May 2019 – PMID: 31151332

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Javier Rivera, María José Tercero, Javier Salas Salas, Julio Hernández Gimeno, and Javier Sánchez Alejo
NCBI – October 2018 – PMID: 30353267

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
M.Vitenet, F.Legrand, B.Bouchet, F.Bogard, R.Taiar, G.Polidori, A.Rapin, F.C.Boyer
Science Direct – July 2018 – DOI: 10.1016/j.rehab.2018.05.004

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Kakushi Matsushita, Akinori Masuda, Chuwa Tei
NCBI – August 2008 – PMID: 18703857

disclaimer

Sex and gender exist on a spectrum. This article uses the terms “male” and “female” to refer to sex assigned at birth.
Learn more about sex and gender.

Fibromyalgia 03 Mobile

FIBROMYALGIA SYMPTOMS
Fibromyalgia causes what is now known as “pain regions.” Some of these places overlap with “trigger points” or “sensitive points,” which were previously referred to as tender spots. However, several of the previously mentioned tender spots have been left out.

The discomfort in these areas is a dull aching that persists. If you’ve had musculoskeletal pain in four of the five pain zones listed in the 2016 revisions to the fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria, your healthcare provider will evaluate a diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

The term “multisite pain” refers to this diagnostic procedure. In contrast, the 1990 fibromyalgia diagnostic criteria definition for “chronic broad pain” was “chronic extensive pain.”

Fibromyalgia 02 Mobile

Instead of focusing on pain length, which was formerly the key criteria for a fibromyalgia diagnosis, this approach of diagnosis focuses on the locations of musculoskeletal discomfort and degree of pain.
Other fibromyalgia symptoms include:
Fatigue
• Problems sleeping
• Long stretches of time spent sleeping without feeling rested (nonrestorative sleep)
• Headaches
• Depression
• Anxiety
• Difficulty concentrating or paying attention
• A dull aching or soreness in the lower belly
• Eyes that are dry
• Bladder problems, like interstitial cystitis

Fibromyalgia Mobile

The brain and nerves in patients with fibromyalgia may misinterpret or overreact to regular pain signals. This could be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain or a dorsal root ganglion malfunction that affects central pain (brain) sensitivity.
Fibromyalgia can also have an impact on your mood and energy level.
Fibromyalgia Fog
Fibromyalgia fog, often known as “fibro fog” or “brain fog,” is a term used by some people to describe the hazy feeling they have when they have fibromyalgia. The following are symptoms of fibro fog:
  • Memory lapses
  • Difficulties concentrating
  • Trouble staying alert
According to a 2015 study published in Rheumatology International, some persons find fibromyalgia’s mental fogginess more distressing than the pain.

Fibromyalgia In Women Mobile

Symptoms of Fibromyalgia in women
Symptoms of fibromyalgia have been found to be more severe in women than in men. Pain, IBS symptoms, and morning fatigue are all more common in women than in men. Period pain is also very prevalent.
However, when the 2016 revisions to the diagnostic criteria were applied, more women than men are diagnosed with fibromyalgia, potentially reducing the degree of difference in pain levels experienced by males and females. To better evaluate that distinction, more research is needed.
The onset of menopause may exacerbate fibromyalgia symptoms. The fact that certain symptoms of menopause and fibromyalgia are nearly identical adds to the confusion.

Fibromyalgia In Men Mobile

Symptoms of
Fibromyalgia in men

Fibromyalgia affects both men and women. Despite this, they may go undiagnosed because it is thought to be mostly a feminine disease. However, as the 2016 diagnostic protocol becomes more widely used, statistics suggest that more men are being diagnosed.
The idea that males who are in pain should “toughen up” contributes to the stigma and difficulty in getting diagnosed. Males who go to the doctor may suffer embarrassment and the possibility that their issues may not be treated seriously.
Trigger points for Fibromyalgia

People were previously diagnosed with fibromyalgia if they had widespread pain and discomfort in at least 11 of 18 specified trigger points throughout their bodies. By pushing forcefully on these locations, healthcare experts could determine how many of them were painful.

Common trigger points included the:

  • The back of the head
  • The top of the shoulders
  • The upper chest
  • The hips
  • The knees
  • The outter elbows

Trigger points, for the most part, are no longer used in the diagnostic procedure.

Instead, if you have pain in four of the five regions of discomfort as specified by the 2016 revised diagnostic criteria, and you have no other diagnosable medical illness that could explain the pain, healthcare practitioners may diagnose fibromyalgia.

Pain experienced when suffering from Fibromyalgia

The most common fibromyalgia symptom is pain. It will be felt in various muscles and soft tissues throughout your body.

The discomfort might range from a moderate ache to a severe and almost intolerable ache. Its severity may influence how well you cope on a daily basis.

Fibromyalgia appears to be caused by a malfunctioning neural system. Things that should not be painful cause your body to overreact. You may also have discomfort in multiple areas of your body.

However, current research cannot determine a specific cause for fibromyalgia. The goal of the research is to better understand this illness and its cause.

Chest Pain

The pain of fibromyalgia in the chest can be shockingly similar to that of a heart attack.

The cartilage that links your ribs to your breastbone is the source of chest pain in fibromyalgia. It’s possible that the ache will spread to your shoulders and arms.

Chest discomfort from fibromyalgia can feel like this:

  • Sharp
  • Stabbing
  • A burning sensation
  • It can cause you to fight to catch your breath, just like a heart attack
Back Pain

One of the most typical places to experience pain is in your back. Low back pain affects the majority of people at some point in their lives. If your back hurts, it’s not always clear if it’s fibromyalgia or something else, like arthritis or a strained muscle.

Other signs and symptoms, including fatigue and brain fog, can help you figure out if you have fibromyalgia. It’s also possible to have fibromyalgia and arthritis at the same time.

Back pain can be relieved with the same drugs that help with other fibromyalgia symptoms. Stretching and strengthening activities can aid in the support of your back’s muscles and soft tissues.

Leg Pain

Fibromyalgia pain can also be felt in the muscles and soft tissues of your legs. Leg pain can resemble the discomfort of a strained muscle or the stiffness associated with arthritis. It could be:

  • Deep
  • Burning
  • Throbbing

Fibromyalgia in the legs can cause numbness or tingle in the legs. A “creepy, creeping” sensation may occur. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), which can overlap with fibromyalgia, is characterised by an overwhelming urge to move your legs.

Leg fatigue is a common symptom of fatigue. Your limbs may feel heavy, as if they’re being weighed down.

What causes Fibromyalgia?

The source of fibromyalgia is unknown to medical professionals and researchers.

According to the most recent study, the explanation appears to be a multiple-hit theory involving genetic disposition (hereditary features) in combination with a trigger, or a collection of triggers, such as infection, trauma, and stress.

Let’s take a closer look at these and other factors that could play a role in why people get fibromyalgia.

Infections

Fibromyalgia can be triggered or made worse by a previous disease. The flu, pneumonia, gastrointestinal diseases like Salmonella and Shigella bacteria, and the Epstein-Barr virus are all linked to fibromyalgia.

Genes

Fibromyalgia is a disease that typically runs in families. You’re more likely to have this ailment if you have a family member who has it.

Certain gene mutations, according to researchers, may have a role. They’ve discovered a few genes that may influence the passage of chemical pain signals between nerve cells.

Trauma

Fibromyalgia can occur in those who have had serious physical or emotional stress. Post-traumatic stress disorder has been connected to the syndrome (PTSD).

Stress

Stress, like trauma, can have long-term consequences on your body. Stress has been linked to hormonal changes that may play a role in fibromyalgia development.

Healthcare professionals aren’t sure what causes fibromyalgia pain to be chronic and widespread. The brain, according to one idea, decreases the pain threshold. Over time, sensations that were not terrible previously become extremely severe.

Another theory is that pain impulses cause the nerves to overreact. They grow more sensitive to the point of causing unneeded or exaggerated pain.

Autoimmunity and Fibromyalgia

The body incorrectly targets its own tissues with proteins called autoantibodies in autoimmune illnesses including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). The immune system assaults the joints or other healthy tissues instead of viruses or germs, as it would normally.

The symptoms of fibromyalgia are quite similar to those of autoimmune illnesses. Because of these symptom commonalities, it’s been suggested that fibromyalgia is an autoimmune disease.

Because fibromyalgia does not produce inflammation and reproducing autoantibodies have yet to be discovered, this claim has been difficult to confirm.

It’s conceivable to have fibromyalgia and an autoimmune condition at the same time.

Risk factors of Fibromyalgia

Flare-ups of fibromyalgia can be caused by:

  • Stress
  • Injury
  • Flu or illness

The brain and neurological system may misinterpret or overreact to normal pain signals due to a chemical imbalance in the brain.

Other factors that contribute to the development of fibromyalgia include:

Gender – Women are currently diagnosed with the majority of fibromyalgia patients, while the explanation for this gap is unknown.

Age – You’re most likely to be diagnosed while you’re in your thirties and forties, and your chances of being diagnosed rise as you get older. Fibromyalgia can affect youngsters as well.

Family history – You may be at a greater risk of developing fibromyalgia if you have close relatives who have it.

Disease – Although fibromyalgia is not a type of arthritis, having lupus or RA increases your chances of developing it.

Diagnosing Fibromyalgia

If you’ve had widespread discomfort for three months or longer, your doctor may diagnose you with fibromyalgia. The term “widespread” refers to the discomfort that affects both sides of your body and is felt above and below the waist.

Your healthcare practitioner must establish that no other condition is causing your pain after a thorough examination.

Fibromyalgia cannot be detected by a lab test or an imaging scan. These tests may be used by your healthcare provider to rule out other possible reasons for your chronic pain.

Because the symptoms of fibromyalgia and autoimmune disorders often overlap, it can be difficult for doctors to tell the two apart. Fibromyalgia and autoimmune illnesses like Sjogren’s syndrome have been linked in several studies.

Fibromyalgia Treatment

There is currently no cure for fibromyalgia.

Instead, treatment focuses on reducing symptoms and enhancing the quality of life by implementing the following strategies:

  • Medications
  • Self-care strategies
  • Lifestyle changes

Medications can help you sleep better and decrease pain. Physical and occupational therapy increase your strength and minimises your body’s stress. Both mentally and physically, exercise and stress-reduction measures can help you feel better.

You may also want to seek out assistance and advice. Seeing a therapist or joining a support group may be necessary.

Pure Medical Fibromyalgia Treatments

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for Fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) has been cited in a number of recent studies to significantly improve the symptoms and quality of life, as well as brain function of patients with fibromyalgia.

Ozone Therapy for Fibromyalgia

Ozone Therapy
For Fibromyalgia

Because the actual physiological mechanism that causes fibromyalgia has yet to be discovered, treatment focuses primarily on symptom management. While this method may provide temporary relief, it is ineffective in restoring your quality of life in the long run.

After researching fibromyalgia and the therapies available, we discovered that ozone therapy holds a lot of potential in terms of long-term effects.

Ozone therapy, also known as major ozonated autohemotherapy, is a procedure in which ozone gas is introduced into your body to help balance the free radicals and antioxidants in your system. This extra oxygen not only kills infections but also regulates your metabolic system and improves circulation, making you more capable of cellular healing.

To put the success of this treatment into perspective, one research of 65 fibromyalgia patients revealed that after ozone therapy, 70% of patients reported considerable improvement (almost 50%) in their symptoms.

Red light therapy for Fibromyalgia

Red Light Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Studies found that red light therapy for fibromyalgia led to significant improvements in Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores, stiffness, pain severity, number of tender points, depression and anxiety, compared to placebo treatment.

Infrared sauna therapy for Fibromyalgia

Infrared Sauna Therapy
for Fibromyalgia

Thermal therapy has long been used to alleviate the symptoms of Fibromyalgia. Research now shows that regular heat therapy using Infrared sauna therapy can have a very positive effect on this condition, contributing to lower levels of pain and overall higher quality of life for those affected by the disorder.

Cryotherapy for Fibromyalgia

Cryotherapy
for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia patients live with debilitating pain and exhaustion on a daily basis. Chronic muscle pain and stiffness, severe fatigue and diminished energy, insomnia, memory problems, migraines, reduced tolerance to exercise, and many other debilitating symptoms are all hallmarks of this incurable condition.
Regular combined treatments and therapies including whole-body cryotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, ozone therapy, red light therapy and infrared sauna therapy have been successfully demonstrated in studies to dramatically alleviate fibromyalgia symptoms and have been successfully used to treat fibromyalgia in many European countries.
The treatments have helped with the following fibromyalgia symptoms:
  • Pain and pain memory
  • Disrupted muscle relaxation and an increased tendency for muscular fatigue
  • Restrictions in the mobility of joints as a result of muscle fatigue
  • Sleep disorders
  • Depressive moods
  • Orthostatic regulatory disruption
  • Organic causes with secondary fibromyalgia (when fibromyalgia occurs as a result of another disease), also spinal diseases, inflammatory-rheumatic diseases and psoriasis.
Medication for Fibromyalgia
The goal of fibromyalgia treatment is to manage pain and improve quality of life. This is often accomplished through a two-pronged approach of self-care and medication.

 

Common medications for fibromyalgia include:

Pain relievers

Mild discomfort can be relieved with over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

Previously, narcotics such as tramadol, an opioid, were administered for pain management. However, research has shown that they are ineffective. Furthermore, the dosage of narcotics is frequently increased rapidly, posing a health risk to those who are administered these prescriptions.

The majority of doctors advise against using drugs to treat fibromyalgia.

Antidepressants

Antidepressants such as duloxetine and milnacipran HCL are sometimes used to relieve fibromyalgia pain and fatigue. These drugs may also aid with sleep quality and neurotransmitter balance.

Antiseizure drugs

Gabapentin was developed to treat epilepsy, but it may also assist people with fibromyalgia to manage their symptoms. Another anti-seizure medicine, pregabalin, was the first approved treatment for fibromyalgia. It prevents nerve cells from transmitting pain signals.

Antidepressants and sleep aids are two medicines that aren’t approved to treat fibromyalgia but can help with symptoms. Muscle relaxants, which were once popular, are now discouraged.

Researchers are also looking into a few experimental treatments that could one-day aid people with fibromyalgia.

Natural Fibromyalgia remedies

You might explore alternatives if the medications prescribed by your doctor don’t completely treat your fibromyalgia symptoms. Many natural remedies aim to alleviate tension and discomfort. They can be used on their own or in conjunction with established medical therapies.

Natural fibromyalgia treatments include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Acupuncture
  • Meditation
  • Yoga (use with caution if hypermobility is present)
  • Tai chi
  • Exercise
  • Massage therapy
  • A balanced, healthy diet

The stress that causes fibromyalgia symptoms and depression can be reduced with the therapy. Group therapy may be the most cost-effective alternative, and it will allow you to meet others who are dealing with similar problems.

Another approach for dealing with stressful conditions is cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). If you prefer one-on-one assistance, individual treatment is also accessible.

It’s vital to keep in mind that most alternative fibromyalgia treatments haven’t been properly researched or confirmed to be helpful. Before you attempt any of these therapies, talk to your doctor about the benefits and dangers.

 

Fibromyalgia recommended diet

Some people claim that following a certain diet plan or avoiding certain foods makes them feel better. However, no single diet has been proven to help fibromyalgia symptoms.

If you have fibromyalgia, make an effort to eat a well-balanced diet. Nutrition is critical in keeping your body healthy, preventing symptoms from worsening, and providing you with a steady amount of energy.

Keep these dietary tips in mind:

  • Eat fruits and vegetables, along with whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Eat more plants than meat.
  • Reduce the amount of sugar in your diet.
  • Exercise as often as you can.
  • Work toward achieving and maintaining your healthy weight.

Certain foods, such as gluten and MSG, may aggravate your symptoms. Keep a food journal where you monitor what you eat and how you feel after each meal if this is the case.

Give your healthcare provider a copy of this diary. They can help you figure out which meals make your symptoms worse. It may be useful to avoid these foods in order to better manage your symptoms.

Pain Relief for Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia pain might be inconvenient and persistent enough to disrupt your everyday activities. Don’t just accept suffering. Consult your healthcare provider for advice on how to deal with it.

One possibility is to take pain medications such as:

  • Aspirin
  • Ibuprofen
  • Naproxen sodium

These medications can:

  • help with discomfort
  • lower pain levels
  • help manage your condition

These drugs help to reduce inflammation. Though inflammation isn’t a main feature of fibromyalgia, it may coexist with RA or another disorder. Pain medicines may help you get a better night’s sleep.

Please keep in mind that NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines) do have adverse effects. If NSAIDs are used over an extended period of time, as is often the case in the treatment of chronic pain, caution is suggested.

Consult your healthcare provider to develop a safe treatment plan that will assist you in managing your condition.

Antidepressants and anti-seizure medications are two more types of medications that your doctor may prescribe to help you manage your pain. Yoga, acupuncture and physical therapy can all aid with fibromyalgia pain relief.

Fatigue from fibromyalgia can be just as difficult to manage as pain. Learn how to improve your sleeping habits.

Living with fibromyalgia

When you live with pain, exhaustion, and other symptoms on a regular basis, your quality of life can suffer. Many individuals have misconceptions about fibromyalgia, which makes matters even more complicated. It’s easy for those around you to dismiss your agony as fictitious because your symptoms are difficult to observe.

Recognise that your situation is genuine. Maintain your determination to find a treatment that works for you. Before you start to feel better, you may need to attempt more than one therapy or combine a few strategies.

Lean on those that are familiar with your situation, such as:
• Your healthcare professional
• Close friends and family
• a therapist

Be easy on yourself. Make sure you don’t overdo it. Above all, believe in your ability to cope with and manage your disease.

Summary

Fibromyalgia is a long-term illness that causes:

  • Widespread pain
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Depression

There is currently no cure, and researchers aren’t sure what causes it. Medications and lifestyle adjustments are used to assist alleviate the symptoms.

Fibromyalgia has been diagnosed in approximately 2 million people in the UK aged 18 and up. The majority of fibromyalgia cases are diagnosed in women, although it can also affect men and children. The majority of persons are diagnosed in their thirties, forties or fifties.

Fibromyalgia is a long-term (chronic) condition. However, some people may go into remission, where their pain and exhaustion go away.

Fibromyalgia Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Fibromyalgia Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
K Curtis, J Katz, C Djaiani, G O’Leary, J Uehling, J Carroll, D Santa Mina, H Clarke, M Gofeld, R Katznelson
NCBI – June 2021 – PMID: 33594439

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Fabiola Atzeni, Roberto Casale, Alessandra Alciati, Ignazio Francesco Masala, Alberto Batticciotto, Rossella Talotta, Maria Chiara Gerardi, Fausto Salaffi, Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini
NCBI – February 2019 – PMID: 30747099

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
M. Muratore, L. Quarta, P. Sarzi Puttini, C. Cosentino, A. Grimaldi, E. Quarta
BMJ – June 2018 – DOI: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-eular.6767

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
U Tirelli, C Cirrito, M Pavanello, C Piasentin, A Lleshi, R Taibi
NCBI – February 2019 – PMID: 30840304

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Serguei Borisovich Kisselev and Sergey Vladimirovich Moskvin
NCBI – December 2018 – PMID: 31360363

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Red Light Therapy
Shu-Wei Yeh, Chien-Hsiung Hong, Ming-Chieh Shih, Ka-Wai Tam, Yao-Hsien Huang, Yi-Chun Kuan
PubMed – May 2019 – PMID: 31151332

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Javier Rivera, María José Tercero, Javier Salas Salas, Julio Hernández Gimeno, and Javier Sánchez Alejo
NCBI – October 2018 – PMID: 30353267

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Cryotherapy
M.Vitenet, F.Legrand, B.Bouchet, F.Bogard, R.Taiar, G.Polidori, A.Rapin, F.C.Boyer
Science Direct – July 2018 – DOI: 10.1016/j.rehab.2018.05.004

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Kakushi Matsushita, Akinori Masuda, Chuwa Tei
NCBI – August 2008 – PMID: 18703857

disclaimer