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Everything You Need
to Know About Insomnia

Insomnia is a form of sleep deprivation. Insomniacs have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or doing both.

Insomnia

When people with insomnia get up from their sleep, they generally don’t feel refreshed. Fatigue and other symptoms may result as a result of this.

According to the British Sleep Society, insomnia is the most frequent of all sleep disorders (BSS).

In fact, according to the BSS, one-third of all individuals experience insomnia symptoms. Approximately 6 to 10% of all individuals have symptoms severe enough to be diagnosed with insomnia disorder.

Insomnia is defined by the BSS as a sleep condition in which persons have difficulty sleeping or staying asleep. If both of these criteria are met, a clinical diagnosis of insomnia is made:

  • For a minimum of three months, you must have sleep problems at least three evenings a week.
  • Major distress or functional issues in a person’s life are caused by sleep problems.
What causes Insomnia?
The reasons of your insomnia will vary depending on the type of insomnia you have.
A variety of factors can contribute to short-term or acute insomnia, including:
• Physical pain
• Stress
• Jet lag
• Some medications
• A distressing or traumatic event
• Changes to your sleep habits, like sleeping in a hotel or new home
Chronic insomnia is defined as insomnia that lasts for at least three months and can be primary or secondary. There is no recognised aetiology for primary insomnia. Secondary insomnia can be caused by a variety of conditions, including:
• Medications that make sleeping difficult, such as arthritis or back pain
• Anxiety or depression, and psychological disorders
• Substance use
• Some medications
• Sleep apnea
• Diabetes
Insomnia’s risk factors
People with specific risk factors are more likely to develop insomnia, according to the British Heart Foundation (BHF). These are some of the risk factors:
• High stress levels
• Depression or distress caused by a life event are examples of emotional disorders.
• Low income
• Traveling through various time zones
• Sedentary lifestyle
• Alterations in working hours or night shifts
Symptoms of Insomnia
People who experience insomnia usually report at least one of these symptoms:
• A habit of waking up too early in the morning
• Sleep that isn’t really refreshing
• Having difficulty falling or staying asleep

 

Insomnia symptoms can lead to a variety of additional issues, including:
• Mood changes
Fatigue
• Irritability

 

You could also find it difficult to focus on simple tasks during the day.
You should also monitor your symptoms while at home. Seek emergency care immediately if you experience:
• Breathing trouble
• Rapid shallow breathing
• Pressure in your chest, heaviness or pain
• Bluish or grey lips, skin, or nail beds
• Rapid heart rate
• Confusion
• Drowsiness

 

People with darker skin tones may have more trouble than people with lighter skin tones, observing skin colour changes that indicate oxygen deprivation.
Get the latest information on COVID-19.
Treating insomnia

Insomnia can be treated with both pharmacological and nonpharmaceutical methods.

A doctor can advise you on which therapies are best for you. It’s possible that you’ll have to try a few different therapies before discovering the one that works best for you.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is recommended as a first-line treatment for chronic insomnia in adults by Mind, a UK mental health advice and support charity.

Training in sleep hygiene may also be recommended. Insomnia can be caused by habits that disrupt sleep. Some of these disruptive behaviours can be changed with sleep hygiene training.

Changes that may be suggested include:

  • Caffeinated beverages should be avoided near bedtime.
  • Avoiding exercise in the hours leading up to bedtime
  • Reducing the amount of time you spend in bed when you aren’t sleeping, such as watching TV or surfing the web on your phone

If you have an underlying psychological or medical issue that is causing your insomnia, seeking therapy for it can help you sleep better.

Find out more about insomnia treatments:

Treating Insomnia Yourself
Insomnia can improve by changing your sleeping habits.
• Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day
• Relax at least 1 hour before bed, E.g. take a bath or read a book
• Keep your bedroom is dark and quiet, use blackout blinds, an eye mask or earplugs
• Exercise regularly during the day
• Make sure your mattress, pillows and covers are comfortable
• Do not smoke or drink alcohol, tea or coffee at least 6 hours before bed
• Do not eat a big meal late at night
• Do not exercise at least 4 hours before bed
• Do not nap during the day
• Do not drive when you feel sleepy
• Do not sleep in after a bad night’s sleep, stick to your regular sleeping hours
• Do not watch tv or use devices, like mobiles, before bed, bright light stimulates the mind
Treatments & therapies Pure Medical provide
for treating Patients suffering from Insomnia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
for Insomnia

Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study. Exposure to high levels of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep.

Ozone Therapy for Insomnia

Ozone Therapy has proven to be the safest medical therapy ever devised, Ozone Therapy is used to treat tuberculosis, anaemia, chlorosis, tinnitus, whooping cough, asthma, bronchitis, hay fever, insomnia, pneumonia, diabetes, gout and syphilis.

Red Light Therapy
for Insomnia

Red light, unlike strong blue light, does not disrupt your sleep cycle, according to research. For those with insomnia and sleep difficulties, red light therapy is showing promising clinical effects. Red light therapy is a simple, non-invasive procedure that gives your skin and cells focused natural light.

Infrared Sauna Therapy
for Insomnia

Many people have trouble getting a decent night’s sleep. Infrared sauna therapy, on the other hand, appears to be beneficial. Infrared sauna therapy has been related to better sleep quality in recent studies. It accomplishes this in a variety of ways. First, it relaxes and soothes us, making it simpler to fall asleep after a long day. Second, red light is used in infrared therapy, which causes your body to generate melatonin. It will be simpler to fall and remain asleep if your body produces more melatonin before bed.
Medication for insomnia

Medications are sometimes used to treat insomnia.

An antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine, is an example of an over-the-counter (OTC) drug that can be used for sleep (Benadryl).

Because OTC medications for insomnia might have side effects, especially if used long term, it’s crucial to consult a doctor before using one.

The following are examples of prescription drugs that can be used to treat insomnia:

  • Zolpidem (Lunesta)
  • Eszopiclone (Ambien)

Before taking any pills or supplements to cure your insomnia, see your doctor.

There could be serious drug interactions or negative effects. Not all “sleep aids” are suitable for everyone.

Find out more about insomnia drugs.

Many cases of insomnia can be effectively managed by making lifestyle modifications or attempting home treatments.

Warm milk, herbal tea, and valerian root are just a few examples of natural sleep aids.

Meditation

Meditation is a drug-free, natural, and simple approach to treating insomnia.

Meditation, according to a 2015 study, can improve the quality of your sleep and make it easier to fall and remain asleep.

Meditation, according to the Mayo Clinic, can also help with the symptoms of diseases that can cause insomnia. These are some of them:

  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Digestive Problems
  • Depression
  • Pain

Many apps and videos are available to help you practice meditation.

Melatonin

During the sleep cycle, the hormone melatonin is naturally produced. Melatonin pills are frequently used to help people sleep better.

Melatonin has not been proven to benefit adults with insomnia in studies.

There is some evidence that vitamins can help you fall asleep faster, but further research is needed.

Melatonin is generally considered safe for a short length of time, but its long-term safety has yet to be proven.

If you’re thinking about using melatonin, consult a doctor first.

Essential oils

Essential oils are powerful aromatic liquids derived from a range of sources, including:

  • Plants
  • Flowers
  • Trees

People use essential oils to treat a number of ailments by breathing them or massaging them into their skin. Aromatherapy is the name for this type of treatment.

The following essential oils are thought to aid sleep:

  • Roman chamomile
  • Cedarwood
  • Lavender
  • Sandalwood
  • Neroli, or bitter orange

Aromatherapy was found to be helpful in improving sleep in a review of 12 trials published in 2015.

Lavender was found to be particularly effective in promoting and maintaining sleep in another investigation. A blend of essential oils reduced sleep disturbance and improved well-being in older persons, according to the study.

When used as prescribed, essential oils rarely cause adverse effects.

There is currently no legislation governing aromatherapists in the United Kingdom, and no licence is required to practise. As a result, it’s critical to choose practitioners and goods wisely.

Pregnancy and insomnia

During pregnancy, insomnia is prevalent, especially in the first and third trimesters.

Hormone fluctuations, nausea, and a greater urge to urinate are just a few of the biological changes that can keep you awake throughout early pregnancy.

You may experience emotional pressures, such as concern about your growing obligations as a mother. You may also be awake due to pain, such as cramping or back discomfort.

To accommodate the new life growing inside you, your body is undergoing several changes, including an active metabolism and a rise in progesterone. It’s also natural for your sleep patterns to shift.

Changes in your lifestyle may be beneficial, such as:
• Maintaining an active lifestyle throughout pregnancy
• Consuming a nutritious diet
• Keeping yourself hydrated
• Maintaining a regular sleeping schedule
• If you feel anxiety, try practising relaxation techniques during the day or taking a warm bath before bedtime

If you want to try a new exercise programme, prescription, or supplement, talk to a doctor first. You’ll want to be sure they’re safe for a pregnant woman.

The good news is that insomnia caused by pregnancy normally passes quickly and has no impact on your baby’s growth.

Testing Insomnia
A doctor will ask you questions regarding the following to arrive at a diagnosis:
• Medical conditions
• Social environment
• Psychological or emotional condition
• Sleep history

 

This information can help them determine the underlying causes of your sleep problems. You might be asked to:
• Record a sleep journal
• Make a note of when you fall asleep
• Keep track of the times that you wake up repeatedly
• Each day, record what time you wake up.

 

Your doctor will be able to see your sleep habits if you keep a sleep journal. Medical tests or blood work may be ordered by your doctor to rule out any medical issues that are interfering with your sleep.

When a clinician suspects an underlying sleep condition such as obstructive sleep apnea, a sleep study may be performed not for the diagnosis of insomnia but for confirmation.

Sleep studies can be carried out in two ways. An overnight visit to a sleep facility is one possibility. The second option allows you to study in the comfort of your own home, in your own bed.

Both sleep study techniques require electrodes to be implanted on various parts of your body, including your head.

Children suffering with Insomnia

Children can suffer from sleeplessness for the same causes as adults. Among the explanations could be:
• Stress
• Medication
• Consuming too much caffeine
• Psychiatric disorders

 

Insomnia could be the cause of your child’s difficulty sleeping or staying asleep or waking up too early.

 

Symptoms of insomnia in children, according to the NHS, include:
• Daytime sleepiness or restlessness
• Irritability and mood swings
• Repeated disciplinary issues
• Memory problems and attention deficits

Children’s treatments are frequently the same as adult treatments.

A regular sleep pattern and proper sleep hygiene will help children. Stress reduction and avoiding screen time near bedtime are also beneficial.

Anxiety and Insomnia

Sleeplessness can cause anxiety, while anxiety can cause insomnia. This can lead to a self-fulfilling cycle that eventually leads to chronic sleeplessness.

Short-term anxiety arises when you worry about the same subject over and over again, such as your job or personal connections.

When the problem is remedied, short-term anxiety usually disappears. Your sleep should also return to normal.

Anxiety disorders, such as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) or panic disorder, can also be identified. Insomnia can be caused by several illnesses in varying degrees.

Anxiety disorders are caused by a variety of factors that aren’t totally understood. Treatment usually lasts a long time and consists of a combination of therapy and drugs.

The same lifestyle and behavioural measures that are recommended for other types of insomnia, such as limiting stressful conversation to the daytime, can help with anxiety-related insomnia.

Depression and insomnia

According to a recent study, insomnia not only increases your chances of developing depression, but sadness can also increase your chances of developing insomnia.

Poor sleep, especially during times of stress, significantly elevated the risk of depression, according to a meta-analysis of 34 research.

Another study discovered that as insomnia progressed and symptoms increased, participants became more depressed.

In certain cases, depression symptoms may come before insomnia.

The good news is that, regardless of whether ailment arises first, the same medicines often assist both sadness and sleeplessness.

The following are the most common treatments:

  • Medications
  • Therapy
  • Lifestyle change

Among the lifestyle adjustments that can be made are:

  • Establishing better sleeping habits
  • Daytime exercise
  • Consuming a healthy diet
Insomnia Complications

Sleep deprivation can have a negative impact on your health. Insomnia can put you at risk for a variety of illnesses, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Stroke
  • Asthma
  • Seizures
  • Fatigue
  • Weak immune system
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease

Insomnia can also:

  • Increase your risk for an accident
  • Affect your performance at school or work
  • Lower your sex drive
  • Affect your memory
Summary

Insomnia isn’t just an inconvenience or a minor nuisance. It’s a genuine sleep disorder that can be treated.

Consult your doctor if you believe you are suffering from insomnia. They can assist you in determining possible causes and developing a safe and effective treatment strategy based on your medical needs.

Insomnia Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Insomnia Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Ying Long, Jiewen Tan, Yulin Nie, Yu Lu, Xiufang Mei, Chaoqun Tu
NCBI – March 2017 – PMID: 28079475

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
James M.Walker, Caroline Mulaty, Donald Hebert, Steffanie H. Wilson, Anne S. Lindblad, Lindell K.Weaver
NCBI – November 2018 – PMID: 30099354

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Brandon E. Hauer, Biruk Negash, Kingsley Chan, Wesley Vuong, Frederick Colbourne, Silvia Pagliardini, Clayton T. Dickson
Science Daily – December 2018 – DOI: 10.1152/jn.00373.2018

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
Y Li, X Feng, H Ren, H Huang, Yu Wang, S Yu
NCBI – February 2021 – PMID: 33713235

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Jiexiu Zhao, PhD, Ye Tian, PhD, Jinlei Nie, PhD, Jincheng Xu, and Dongsen Liu
NCBI – December 2012 – PMID: 23182016

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Philip D. Sloane, Mariana Figueiro, and Lauren Cohen
NCBI – November 2013 – PMID: 24285919

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Mariana G Figueiro, Levent Sahin, Charles Roohan, Michael Kalsher, Barbara Plitnick, and Mark S Rea
NCBI – May 2019 – PMID: 31118850

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Joy Hussain and Marc Cohen
NCBI – April 2018 – PMID: 29849692

disclaimer

Pure Medical Insomnia Mobile Header

Everything You Need to Know About Insomnia

INSOMNIA IS A FORM OF SLEEP DEPRIVATION. INSOMNIACS HAVE TROUBLE FALLING ASLEEP, STAYING ASLEEP, OR DOING BOTH.

INSOMNIA

When people with insomnia get up from their sleep, they generally don’t feel refreshed. Fatigue and other symptoms may result as a result of this.

According to the British Sleep Society, insomnia is the most frequent of all sleep disorders (BSS).

In fact, according to the BSS, one-third of all individuals experience insomnia symptoms. Approximately 6 to 10% of all individuals have symptoms severe enough to be diagnosed with insomnia disorder.

Insomnia is defined by the BSS as a sleep condition in which persons have difficulty sleeping or staying asleep. If both of these criteria are met, a clinical diagnosis of insomnia is made:

For a minimum of three months, you must have sleep problems at least three evenings a week.
Major distress or functional issues in a person’s life are caused by sleep problems.

WHAT CAUSES INSOMNIA?
The reasons for your insomnia will vary depending on the type of insomnia you have.
A variety of factors can contribute to short-term or acute insomnia, including:
• Physical pain
• Stress
• Jet lag
• Some medications
• A distressing or traumatic event
• Changes to your sleep habits, like sleeping in a hotel or new home

01, Pure Medical Insomnia Mobile

Chronic insomnia is defined as insomnia that lasts for at least three months and can be primary or secondary. There is no recognised aetiology for primary insomnia. Secondary insomnia can be caused by a variety of conditions, including:
• Medications that make sleeping difficult, such as arthritis or back pain
• Anxiety or depression, and psychological disorders
• Substance use
• Some medications
• Sleep apnea
• Diabetes

INSOMNIA’S RISK FACTORS

People with specific risk factors are more likely to develop insomnia, according to the British Heart Foundation (BHF). These are some of the risk factors:
• High-stress levels
• Depression or distress caused by a life event are examples of emotional disorders.
• Low income
• Traveling through various time zones
• Sedentary lifestyle
• Alterations in working hours or night shifts

02, Pure Medical Insomnia Mobile

SYMPTOMS OF INSOMNIA
People who experience insomnia usually report at least one of these symptoms:
• A habit of waking up too early in the morning
• Sleep that isn’t really refreshing
• Having difficulty falling or staying asleep
Insomnia symptoms can lead to a variety of additional issues, including:
• Mood changes
Fatigue
• Irritability
You could also find it difficult to focus on simple tasks during the day.

04, Pure Medical Insomnia Mobile

You should also monitor your symptoms while at home. Seek emergency care immediately if you experience:
• Breathing trouble
• Rapid shallow breathing
• Pressure in your chest, heaviness or pain
• Bluish or grey lips, skin, or nail beds
• Rapid heart rate
• Confusion
• Drowsiness
People with darker skin tones may have more trouble than people with lighter skin tones, observing skin colour changes that indicate oxygen deprivation.
Get the latest information on COVID-19.
Treating insomnia

Insomnia can be treated with both pharmacological and nonpharmaceutical methods.

A doctor can advise you on which therapies are best for you. It’s possible that you’ll have to try a few different therapies before discovering the one that works best for you.

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is recommended as a first-line treatment for chronic insomnia in adults by Mind, a UK mental health advice and support charity.

Training in sleep hygiene may also be recommended. Insomnia can be caused by habits that disrupt sleep. Some of these disruptive behaviours can be changed with sleep hygiene training.

Changes that may be suggested include:

Caffeinated beverages should be avoided near bedtime.
Avoiding exercise in the hours leading up to bedtime
Reducing the amount of time you spend in bed when you aren’t sleeping, such as watching TV or surfing the web on your phone
If you have an underlying psychological or medical issue that is causing your insomnia, seeking therapy for it can help you sleep better.

Find out more about insomnia treatments:

03, Pure Medical Insomnia Mobile

Treatments & therapies Pure Medical use
when treating Patients suffering from Insomnia

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Insomnia Mobile

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
for Insomnia

Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study. Exposure to high levels of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep.

Ozone Therapy to treat Insomnia Mobile

Ozone Therapy for Insomnia

Ozone Therapy has proven to be the safest medical therapy ever devised, Ozone Therapy is used to treat tuberculosis, anaemia, chlorosis, tinnitus, whooping cough, asthma, bronchitis, hay fever, insomnia, pneumonia, diabetes, gout and syphilis.

Red Light Therapy to treat Insomnia Mobile

Red Light Therapy
for Insomnia

Red light, unlike strong blue light, does not disrupt your sleep cycle, according to research. For those with insomnia and sleep difficulties, red light therapy is showing promising clinical effects. Red light therapy is a simple, non-invasive procedure that gives your skin and cells focused natural light.

Infrared Sauna Therapy to treat Insomnia Mobile

Infrared Sauna Therapy
for Insomnia

Many people have trouble getting a decent night’s sleep. Infrared sauna therapy, on the other hand, appears to be beneficial. Infrared sauna therapy has been related to better sleep quality in recent studies. It accomplishes this in a variety of ways. First, it relaxes and soothes us, making it simpler to fall asleep after a long day. Second, red light is used in infrared therapy, which causes your body to generate melatonin. It will be simpler to fall and remain asleep if your body produces more melatonin before bed.
Medication for insomnia

Medications are sometimes used to treat insomnia.

An antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine, is an example of an over-the-counter (OTC) drug that can be used for sleep (Benadryl).

Because OTC medications for insomnia might have side effects, especially if used long term, it’s crucial to consult a doctor before using one.

The following are examples of prescription drugs that can be used to treat insomnia:

  • Zolpidem (Lunesta)
  • Eszopiclone (Ambien)

Before taking any pills or supplements to cure your insomnia, see your doctor.

There could be serious drug interactions or negative effects. Not all “sleep aids” are suitable for everyone.

Find out more about insomnia drugs.

Many cases of insomnia can be effectively managed by making lifestyle modifications or attempting home treatments.

Warm milk, herbal tea, and valerian root are just a few examples of natural sleep aids.

Meditation

Meditation is a drug-free, natural, and simple approach to treating insomnia.

Meditation, according to a 2015 study, can improve the quality of your sleep and make it easier to fall and remain asleep.

Meditation, according to the Mayo Clinic, can also help with the symptoms of diseases that can cause insomnia. These are some of them:

  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Digestive Problems
  • Depression
  • Pain

Many apps and videos are available to help you practice meditation.

Melatonin

During the sleep cycle, the hormone melatonin is naturally produced. Melatonin pills are frequently used to help people sleep better.

Melatonin has not been proven to benefit adults with insomnia in studies.

There is some evidence that vitamins can help you fall asleep faster, but further research is needed.

Melatonin is generally considered safe for a short length of time, but its long-term safety has yet to be proven.

If you’re thinking about using melatonin, consult a doctor first.

Essential oils

Essential oils are powerful aromatic liquids derived from a range of sources, including:

  • Plants
  • Flowers
  • Trees

People use essential oils to treat a number of ailments by breathing them or massaging them into their skin. Aromatherapy is the name for this type of treatment.

The following essential oils are thought to aid sleep:

  • Roman chamomile
  • Cedarwood
  • Lavender
  • Sandalwood
  • Neroli, or bitter orange

Aromatherapy was found to be helpful in improving sleep in a review of 12 trials published in 2015.

Lavender was found to be particularly effective in promoting and maintaining sleep in another investigation. A blend of essential oils reduced sleep disturbance and improved well-being in older persons, according to the study.

When used as prescribed, essential oils rarely cause adverse effects.

There is currently no legislation governing aromatherapists in the United Kingdom, and no licence is required to practise. As a result, it’s critical to choose practitioners and goods wisely.

Pregnancy and insomnia

During pregnancy, insomnia is prevalent, especially in the first and third trimesters.

Hormone fluctuations, nausea, and a greater urge to urinate are just a few of the biological changes that can keep you awake throughout early pregnancy.

You may experience emotional pressures, such as concern about your growing obligations as a mother. You may also be awake due to pain, such as cramping or back discomfort.

To accommodate the new life growing inside you, your body is undergoing several changes, including an active metabolism and a rise in progesterone. It’s also natural for your sleep patterns to shift.

Changes in your lifestyle may be beneficial, such as:
• Maintaining an active lifestyle throughout pregnancy
• Consuming a nutritious diet
• Keeping yourself hydrated
• Maintaining a regular sleeping schedule
• If you feel anxiety, try practising relaxation techniques during the day or taking a warm bath before bedtime

If you want to try a new exercise programme, prescription, or supplement, talk to a doctor first. You’ll want to be sure they’re safe for a pregnant woman.

The good news is that insomnia caused by pregnancy normally passes quickly and has no impact on your baby’s growth.

Testing Insomnia
A doctor will ask you questions regarding the following to arrive at a diagnosis:
• Medical conditions
• Social environment
• Psychological or emotional condition
• Sleep history

 

This information can help them determine the underlying causes of your sleep problems. You might be asked to:
• Record a sleep journal
• Make a note of when you fall asleep
• Keep track of the times that you wake up repeatedly
• Each day, record what time you wake up.

 

Your doctor will be able to see your sleep habits if you keep a sleep journal. Medical tests or blood work may be ordered by your doctor to rule out any medical issues that are interfering with your sleep.

When a clinician suspects an underlying sleep condition such as obstructive sleep apnea, a sleep study may be performed not for the diagnosis of insomnia but for confirmation.

Sleep studies can be carried out in two ways. An overnight visit to a sleep facility is one possibility. The second option allows you to study in the comfort of your own home, in your own bed.

Both sleep study techniques require electrodes to be implanted on various parts of your body, including your head.

Children suffering with Insomnia

Children can suffer from sleeplessness for the same causes as adults. Among the explanations could be:
• Stress
• Medication
• Consuming too much caffeine
• Psychiatric disorders

 

Insomnia could be the cause of your child’s difficulty sleeping or staying asleep or waking up too early.

 

Symptoms of insomnia in children, according to the NHS, include:
• Daytime sleepiness or restlessness
• Irritability and mood swings
• Repeated disciplinary issues
• Memory problems and attention deficits

Children’s treatments are frequently the same as adult treatments.

A regular sleep pattern and proper sleep hygiene will help children. Stress reduction and avoiding screen time near bedtime are also beneficial.

Anxiety and Insomnia

Sleeplessness can cause anxiety, while anxiety can cause insomnia. This can lead to a self-fulfilling cycle that eventually leads to chronic sleeplessness.

Short-term anxiety arises when you worry about the same subject over and over again, such as your job or personal connections.

When the problem is remedied, short-term anxiety usually disappears. Your sleep should also return to normal.

Anxiety disorders, such as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) or panic disorder, can also be identified. Insomnia can be caused by several illnesses in varying degrees.

Anxiety disorders are caused by a variety of factors that aren’t totally understood. Treatment usually lasts a long time and consists of a combination of therapy and drugs.

The same lifestyle and behavioural measures that are recommended for other types of insomnia, such as limiting stressful conversation to the daytime, can help with anxiety-related insomnia.

Depression and insomnia

According to a recent study, insomnia not only increases your chances of developing depression, but sadness can also increase your chances of developing insomnia.

Poor sleep, especially during times of stress, significantly elevated the risk of depression, according to a meta-analysis of 34 research.

Another study discovered that as insomnia progressed and symptoms increased, participants became more depressed.

In certain cases, depression symptoms may come before insomnia.

The good news is that, regardless of whether ailment arises first, the same medicines often assist both sadness and sleeplessness.

The following are the most common treatments:

  • Medications
  • Therapy
  • Lifestyle change

Among the lifestyle adjustments that can be made are:

  • Establishing better sleeping habits
  • Daytime exercise
  • Consuming a healthy diet
Insomnia Complications

Sleep deprivation can have a negative impact on your health. Insomnia can put you at risk for a variety of illnesses, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Stroke
  • Asthma
  • Seizures
  • Fatigue
  • Weak immune system
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease

Insomnia can also:

  • Increase your risk for an accident
  • Affect your performance at school or work
  • Lower your sex drive
  • Affect your memory
Summary

Insomnia isn’t just an inconvenience or a minor nuisance. It’s a genuine sleep disorder that can be treated.

Consult your doctor if you believe you are suffering from insomnia. They can assist you in determining possible causes and developing a safe and effective treatment strategy based on your medical needs.

Insomnia Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Insomnia Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Ying Long, Jiewen Tan, Yulin Nie, Yu Lu, Xiufang Mei, Chaoqun Tu
NCBI – March 2017 – PMID: 28079475

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
James M.Walker, Caroline Mulaty, Donald Hebert, Steffanie H. Wilson, Anne S. Lindblad, Lindell K.Weaver
NCBI – November 2018 – PMID: 30099354

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Brandon E. Hauer, Biruk Negash, Kingsley Chan, Wesley Vuong, Frederick Colbourne, Silvia Pagliardini, Clayton T. Dickson
Science Daily – December 2018 – DOI: 10.1152/jn.00373.2018

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
Y Li, X Feng, H Ren, H Huang, Yu Wang, S Yu
NCBI – February 2021 – PMID: 33713235

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Jiexiu Zhao, PhD, Ye Tian, PhD, Jinlei Nie, PhD, Jincheng Xu, and Dongsen Liu
NCBI – December 2012 – PMID: 23182016

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Philip D. Sloane, Mariana Figueiro, and Lauren Cohen
NCBI – November 2013 – PMID: 24285919

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Mariana G Figueiro, Levent Sahin, Charles Roohan, Michael Kalsher, Barbara Plitnick, and Mark S Rea
NCBI – May 2019 – PMID: 31118850

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Joy Hussain and Marc Cohen
NCBI – April 2018 – PMID: 29849692

disclaimer