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Heart Disease

Heart Disease

Conditions that restrict or block blood arteries are referred to as heart disease (coronary heart disease). This can result in a heart attack, angina, or stroke in some cases. Heart illness also includes disorders that damage the muscle and valves of your heart, as well as irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias).
Conditions that restrict or block blood arteries are referred to as heart disease (coronary heart disease). This can result in a heart attack, angina, or stroke in some cases. Heart illness also includes disorders that damage the muscle and valves of your heart, as well as irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias).

Understanding Heart Disease

Heart and circulation disorders account for a quarter of all deaths in the UK, or over 160,000 each year, an average of 460 deaths per day, or once every three minutes. In the United Kingdom, around 7.6 million people suffer from heart or circulatory disease, with 4 million males and 3.6 million women.

Heart disease knows no bounds. It is the leading cause of death for a variety of individuals, including whites, Hispanics, and Black and the number is rising.

While heart disease can be fatal, it is also avoidable in the majority of cases. Early adoption of healthy living choices will help you live longer and have a healthier heart.

What are the many
types of heart disease?

Heart Disease Types

What are the many types of heart disease?

The term “heart disease” refers to a variety of cardiovascular issues. Heart illness encompasses a wide range of diseases and ailments. The following are examples of different types of cardiac disease:

  • Atherosclerosis. The hardening of the arteries is known as atherosclerosis.
  • Arrhythmia. A heart rhythm anomaly is known as an arrhythmia.
  • Cardiomyopathy. The cardiac muscles harden or weaken as a result of this disorder.
  • Congenital heart defects. Heart abnormalities that are present at birth are known as congenital heart defects.
  • Coronary artery disease (CAD). A condition that affects the (CAD). Plaque buildup in the arteries of the heart causes CAD. Ischemic heart disease is another name for it.
  • Infections of the heart. Bacteria, viruses, and parasites can all cause heart infections.
The phrase “cardiovascular disease” refers to heart disorders that affect the blood vessels particularly.

What are the signs and
symptoms of Heart disease?

Heart Disease Symptoms

What are the signs and symptoms of Heart disease?

Different types of heart disease can cause a wide range of symptoms.

Arrhythmias

Arrhythmias are irregular heartbeats. The symptoms you encounter may vary depending on the type of arrhythmia you have – fast or slow heartbeats. An arrhythmia can cause the following symptoms:

  • Light-headedness
  • A rapid heartbeat or a fluttering heart
  • A slow heartbeat
  • Episodes of fainting
  • Dizziness
  • Chest discomfort

Atherosclerosis

The supply of blood to your extremities is reduced as a result of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis symptoms include chest pain and shortness of breath, as well as:

  • A feeling of coldness, particularly in the limbs
  • Numbness in the limbs, especially
  • Pain that is unique or unexplainable
  • A lack of strength in your legs and arms

Congenital heart defects

Heart abnormalities that are present at birth that arises while a foetus is growing are known as congenital heart defects. Some cardiac problems go undetected for years. Others may be discovered as a result of symptoms, such as:

  • Skin with a blue tinge
  • Oedema in the extremities
  • Breathing problems or shortness of breath
  • Weariness and exhaustion
  • Heartbeats that are irregular

Coronary artery disease (CAD)

Plaque buildup in the arteries that transport oxygen-rich blood through the heart and lungs is known as coronary artery disease (CAD). Symptoms of coronary artery disease include:

  • Chest discomfort or pain
  • A feeling of squeezing or pressure in the chest
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nausea
  • Feelings of indigestion or gas

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart muscles enlarge and become rigid, thick, or weak. The following are some of the signs and symptoms of this condition:

Infections of the heart

Endocarditis and myocarditis are two disorders that might be described as heart infections. A heart infection can cause the following symptoms:

  • Chest discomfort
  • Coughing or chest congestion
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Rashes on the skin

Learn more about heart disease symptoms and indicators.

Symptoms of
heart disease in women

Heart Disease Symptoms Women

Symptoms of heart disease in women

Women and men have different indications and symptoms of heart disease, especially when it comes to coronary artery disease (CAD) and other cardiovascular diseases.

A 2003 study looked at the most common symptoms in women who had had a heart attack. “Classic” heart attack symptoms like chest pain and tingling were not among the top symptoms. Women, on the other hand, were more likely to express worry, sleep difficulties, and unexpected or unexplained exhaustion, according to the study.

Furthermore, 80% of the women in the research said they had been experiencing similar symptoms for at least a month before having a heart attack.

Heart disease symptoms in women can be confused with those of other illnesses such as depression, menopause, and anxiety.

Symptoms of cardiac disease in women include:

  • Dizziness
  • Paleness
  • Breathing problems, such as shortness of breath or shallow breathing
  • Light-headedness
  • Passing out or fainting
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Jaw ache
  • Neck ache
  • Backache
  • Indigestion or soreness in the chest and stomach that feels like it’s filled with gas
  • Cold sweats

Find out why many women say they wouldn’t phone 999 if they felt they were having a heart attack by reading more about the common signs and symptoms of heart disease in women.

What Causes
Heart Disease?

Heart Disease Causes

What Causes
Heart Disease?

Heart disease is a term that refers to a group of diseases and ailments that cause heart issues. Each type of cardiac disease is caused by a different factor. Plaque buildup in the arteries causes atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). Heart disease can also be caused by other factors, which are detailed further below.

Arrhythmia is a malfunctioning heartbeat

An aberrant heartbeat can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  • Diabetes
  • CAD
  • Congenital heart abnormalities are among the most common types of cardiac defects.
  • Natural treatments, vitamins, and pharmaceuticals
  • Blood pressure that is too high (hypertension)
  • Excessive use of alcohol or caffeine
  • Disorders of substance abuse
  • Anxiety and stressHarm or sickness to the heart

Causes of congenital heart defects

This type of cardiac disease develops when a baby is still in the womb. Some cardiac defects are significant and should be discovered and treated as soon as possible. Some people may be undiagnosed for years.

The anatomy of your heart might also change as you get older. This can result in a cardiac defect, which can cause consequences and issues.

Cardiomyopathy is a condition that affects the heart

Cardiomyopathy comes in a variety of forms. Each type is the outcome of its own set of circumstances.

  • Dilated cardiomyopathy is a condition in which the heart is dilated. The reason for this most prevalent type of cardiomyopathy, which results in a weaker heart, is unknown. It could be due to earlier cardiac damage, such as that caused by medicines, infections, or a heart attack. It could also be the result of uncontrolled blood pressure or an inherited disorder.
  • Cardiomyopathy with hypertrophy. This type of cardiac disease causes the heart muscle to thicken. It’s frequently passed down down the generations.
  • Cardiomyopathy with constriction. The cause of this kind of cardiomyopathy, which results in hard heart walls, is frequently unknown. Scar tissue buildup and amyloidosis, a form of aberrant protein buildup, are two possible causes.

Causes of Heart Infection

The most prevalent causes of cardiac infections include bacteria, parasites, and viruses. If not treated properly, uncontrolled infections in the body can affect the heart.

How is
Heart Disease
diagnosed?

Heart Disease Diagnosis

How is Heart Disease diagnosed?

To diagnose heart disease, your doctor may perform a variety of tests and exams. Some of these tests can be done before any symptoms of heart disease appear. Others may be used to investigate potential reasons for symptoms as they arise.

Physical examinations and blood testing are required.

Your doctor will begin by performing a physical examination and taking a detailed account of your symptoms. Then they’ll want to hear about your family’s medical history as well as your own. In some heart conditions, genetics may play a role. Share this information with your doctor if you have a close relative who has heart disease.

Blood tests are commonly requested. This is due to the fact that they can assist your doctor in determining your cholesterol levels and identifying indicators of inflammation.

 

Non-invasive examinations

Heart disease can be diagnosed using a range of non-invasive diagnostics.

  • An EKG is a type of electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG). This test can track the electrical activity of your heart and alert your doctor to any anomalies.
  • Echocardiogram. This ultrasound exam can provide your GP with a detailed view of the structure of your heart.
  • A stress test was conducted. This exam is done while you are doing something demanding like walking, running, or riding a stationary bike. Your doctor can monitor your heart’s activity in response to variations in physical exertion during the test.
  • Ultrasound of the carotid arteries. Your GP may prescribe this ultrasound exam to get a comprehensive ultrasound of your carotid arteries.
  • A Holter monitor is a device that records heartbeats. You may be asked to wear this heart rate monitor for 24 to 48 hours by your GP. It enables them to gain a more comprehensive picture of your heart’s activities.
  • Tilt table test. Your GP may recommend this test if you’ve recently fainted or felt lightheaded upon standing up or sitting down. You’ll be strapped to a table and carefully elevated or lowered while your heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen levels are monitored.
  • CT scan. This imaging procedure provides a highly detailed X-ray image of your heart to your doctor.
  • MRI of the heart. A heart MRI, like a CT scan, can produce a thorough image of your heart and blood vessels.

Invasive examinations

If a physical exam, blood tests, and noninvasive testing don’t reveal anything, your doctor may want to peek inside your body to see what’s causing any strange symptoms. The following are examples of invasive tests:

  • Coronary angiography and cardiac catheterization. A catheter may be inserted into your heart through the groyne and arteries by your doctor. They’ll use the catheter to do testing on the heart and blood arteries. Your doctor can do a coronary angiography once the catheter is in your heart. A dye is injected into the fragile arteries and capillaries around the heart during coronary angiography. The dye aids in the creation of a highly detailed X-ray image.
  • An investigation into electrophysiology. Your doctor may use a catheter to attach electrodes to your heart during this procedure. Your doctor can transmit electric pulses through the electrodes and record how the heart responds once they are in place.Learn more about the diagnostic tests used to detect heart disease.

What are some heart disease risks & preventive factors?

Heart Disease Risks

What are some heart disease risks & preventive factors?

Some of the first measures toward a healthy heart include maintaining good blood pressure and cholesterol levels. In millimetres of mercury, blood pressure is measured (mm Hg). Blood pressure that is less than 120 systolic and 80 diastolic is considered healthy, and is typically stated as “120 over 80” or “120/80 mm Hg.” The measurement of pressure while the heart is contracting is known as systolic. When the heart is at rest, the diastolic measurement is taken. Higher values imply that the heart is pumping blood too hard.

Your optimum cholesterol level is determined by your risk factors and family history of heart disease. If you have a high risk of heart disease, diabetes, or have already had a heart attack, your target levels will be lower than those of persons who have a low or moderate risk of heart disease.

Look for stress-relieving techniques

Stress management, as simple as it sounds, can help you reduce your risk of heart disease. Don’t discount the role of persistent stress in heart disease. If you’re constantly overwhelmed, nervous, or dealing with stressful life events like moving, changing jobs, or going through a divorce, talk to your doctor.

Consume a nutritious, well-balanced diet

A low-fat, high-fibre diet with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables (5 pieces per day) and whole grains is recommended.

You should consume no more than 6g (0.2oz) of salt each day because too much salt will raise your blood pressure. 1 tablespoon of salt equals 6 grammes.

Saturated and unsaturated fats are the two forms of fat. Foods high in saturated fats should be avoided because they raise the amount of harmful cholesterol in your blood.

Saturated fat-rich foods include:

  • Pies made with meat
  • Sausages and fatty meat slices
  • Butter
  • Ghee is a form of butter that is commonly used in Indian cuisine.
  • Lard
  • Cream
  • Hard cheese
  • Biscuits and cakes
  • Coconut or palm oil-containing meals

Unsaturated fats, on the other hand, have been demonstrated to boost levels of good cholesterol and aid in the reduction of artery blockage in a balanced diet.

Lowering your blood pressure and cholesterol levels are two ways you can lessen your risk of getting coronary heart disease (CHD).

Consume a nutritious, well-balanced diet

A low-fat, high-fibre diet with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables (5 pieces per day) and whole grains is recommended.

You should consume no more than 6g (0.2oz) of salt each day because too much salt will raise your blood pressure. 1 tablespoon of salt equals 6 grammes.

Saturated and unsaturated fats are the two forms of fat. Foods high in saturated fats should be avoided because they raise the amount of harmful cholesterol in your blood.

Unsaturated fat-rich foods include:

  • Fatty fish
  • Avocados
  • Seeds and nuts
  • Sunflower, rapeseed, olive, and vegetable oils are some of the most common.

You should also avoid consuming too much sugar in your diet since this might increase your risk of developing diabetes, which has been linked to an increased risk of CHD.

Find out more about:

  • A balanced diet
  • Reducing saturated fat intake
  • Sugar-related facts

Increase your physical activity

The best method to maintain a healthy weight is to combine a nutritious diet with frequent exercise. High blood pressure is less likely if you maintain a healthy weight.

Regular exercise will improve the efficiency of your heart and circulatory system, lower your cholesterol, and keep your blood pressure at a healthy level.

Regular exercise lowers your chances of having a heart attack. The heart is a muscle, and it benefits from exercise just like any other muscle. With little effort, a powerful heart can pump more blood around your body.

Walking, swimming, and dancing are all aerobic exercises that make your heart work harder and maintain it healthy.

More information on fitness and exercise can be found here.

Maintain a healthy weight

Your optimal weight in relation to your height and build can be determined by a GP or practise nurse. Alternatively, use our BMI calculator to determine your body mass index (BMI).

Learn more about how to lose weight.

Stop Smoking

If you smoke, quitting will lower your risk of heart disease.

Smoking is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis (furring of the arteries). In those under the age of 50, it also causes the majority of occurrences of coronary thrombosis.

According to research, combining stop-smoking support with stop-smoking medications like patches or gum increases your chances of quitting smoking by up to three times.

Consult your doctor or find out more about quitting smoking here.

Reduce your alcohol consumption

If you drink, don’t consume more than the maximum amount recommended.

If you drink more than 14 units per week, it is recommended that you spread your drinking over three days or more.
Binge drinking should be avoided at all costs, as it raises the risk of a heart attack.

Learn more about alcohol and drinking.

Maintain a healthy blood pressure level

Blood pressure can be controlled by eating a healthy, low-saturated-fat diet, exercising regularly, and, if necessary, using blood pressure medication.

Blood pressure should be less than 140/90mmHg. If you have high blood pressure, ask your doctor to check it on a regular basis.

Find out more about hypertension.

Keep your diabetes in check

If you have diabetes, you’re more likely to get CHD. Controlling your weight and blood pressure, as well as being physically active, will help you regulate your blood sugar levels.

If you have diabetes, you should keep your blood pressure below 130/80mmHg.

More information on diabetes can be found here.

Take any medication that has been prescribed to you

If you have CHD, you may be given medication to assist alleviate your symptoms and preventing further complications.

Your doctor may prescribe medicine to protect you from developing heart-related problems if you do not have CHD but have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or a family history of heart disease.

If you’ve been prescribed medication, it’s critical that you take it and follow the instructions exactly. Stopping your medicine without first visiting a doctor is likely to make your symptoms worse and put your health in jeopardy.

You have no influence over the risk variables

Other heart disease risk factors include:

  • Family history
  • Ethnicity
  • Sex
  • Age

Although you can’t control these risk factors, you can keep track of their effects. If there is a family history of CAD, it is especially concerning if:

  • A male relative, such as a father or brother, who is under 55 years old
  • A female relative, such as a mother or sister, who is under the age of 65

What is the treatment
options for heart disease?

Heart Disease Treatment

What is the treatment options for heart disease?

Treatment for heart disease is largely determined by the type of heart disease and how far it has progressed. If you have a heart infection, for example, your doctor is likely to prescribe antibiotics.

If you have plaque buildup, they may use a two-pronged approach: they may prescribe a medicine to help lower your risk of further plaque buildup, and they may also work with you to make healthy lifestyle changes.

There are three types of treatment for heart disease:

Lifestyle changes

Heart disease can be avoided by adopting a healthy lifestyle. They can also assist you in treating the problem and preventing it from worsening. One of the first things you might want to improve is your diet.

Reduce your risk of heart disease complications by eating a low-sodium, low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables. The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is one example.

Similarly, regular exercise and stopping smoking can aid in the treatment of cardiac disease. Reduce your alcohol consumption as well.

Medications

Certain types of cardiac disease may necessitate the use of medicines. Your doctor may prescribe a medicine to treat or manage your heart condition. Medications may be used to reduce or eliminate the risk of problems. The medication you’re given is determined by the sort of heart disease you have. Find out more about the medications that may be used to treat heart disease.

Surgery or invasive procedures

Surgery or a medical procedure may be required in some types of heart disease to treat the ailment and prevent symptoms from worsening.

For example, if plaque buildup has totally or nearly completely clogged your arteries, your doctor may place a stent in the artery to restore normal blood flow. Your doctor’s procedure will be determined by the type of heart disease you have and the level of heart damage.

Alternative and Complementary therapies used
when treating Heart Disease patients

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

In Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, patients breathe pure oxygen at high pressures in a specially built chamber. It’s occasionally used as a treatment to try to enhance the supply of oxygen to the injured heart and lessen the portion of the heart that’s at risk of dying 1.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy has been proven to be safe and successful in applications such as the treatment of atherosclerotic disease in peripheral arteries (outside of the heart) 2.

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is a form of alternative medicine that has been used to cure a variety of ailments, including diabetes and heart failure  3, 4.

Red Light Therapy

In cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue, Red light therapy greatly boosted ATP levels. These findings suggest that increasing ATP production with LED-Red treatment is critical for improving cardiomyocyte contractile function in the HF heart 5.

Infrared Sauna therapy

In chronic heart failure patients, Infrared sauna therapy is both safe and effective at improving clinical symptoms and cardiac function, as well as shrinking cardiac size. 6, 7.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy outside the chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

In Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, patients breathe pure oxygen at high pressures in a specially built chamber. It’s occasionally used as a treatment to try to enhance the supply of oxygen to the injured heart and lessen the portion of the heart that’s at risk of dying 1.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy has been proven to be safe and successful in applications such as the treatment of atherosclerotic disease in peripheral arteries (outside of the heart) 2.

Ozone Therapy

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is a form of alternative medicine that has been used to cure a variety of ailments, including diabetes and heart failure  3, 4.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy

In cardiomyocytes and cardiac tissue, Red light therapy greatly boosted ATP levels. These findings suggest that increasing ATP production with LED-Red treatment is critical for improving cardiomyocyte contractile function in the HF heart 5.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy

In chronic heart failure patients, Infrared sauna therapy is both safe and effective at improving clinical symptoms and cardiac function, as well as shrinking cardiac size. 6, 7.

What’s the link between
heart disease
and Hypertension?

Heart Disease Hypertension

What’s the link between heart disease and Hypertension?

Chronic elevated blood pressure is the cause of hypertensive heart disease. To circulate blood throughout your body, hypertension forces your heart to work harder. This increased pressure can result in a thickened, enlarged heart muscle as well as restricted arteries, which can cause a variety of cardiac problems.

Your heart muscles may get harder and thicker as a result of the greater force required to pump blood. This may have an effect on how well your heart pumps. The arteries might become less elastic and more rigid as a result of hypertensive heart disease. This can cause blood circulation to slow down and prevent your body from receiving the oxygen-rich blood it requires.

Because hypertensive heart disease is the leading cause of death in persons with high blood pressure, it’s critical to start treating it as soon as possible. Treatment can help to prevent further difficulties and damage.

More information on hypertensive heart disease can be found here.

Is there a cure for heart disease?

Cure for Heart Disease

Is there a cure for heart disease?

Heart disease is incurable and irreversible. It necessitates lifelong treatment and close monitoring. Medications, treatments, and lifestyle modifications can alleviate many of the symptoms of heart disease. If these techniques fail, a coronary intervention or bypass surgery may be necessary.

Make an appointment with your GP if you suspect you are experiencing symptoms of heart disease or if you have risk factors for heart disease. Together, you can assess your risks, do a few screening tests, and devise a strategy for remaining healthy.

It’s critical to take care of your general health today, rather than waiting for a diagnosis. This is especially true if you have a family history of heart disease or if you have a condition that puts you at higher risk for heart disease. Taking care of your body and heart now will pay off in the future.