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Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Cerebral Small
Vessel Disease

Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is an umbrella term for a multitude of disorders involving the brain’s small blood vessels.
Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is an umbrella term for a multitude of disorders involving the brain’s small blood vessels.

Understanding
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD)

Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common finding on elderly people’s CT and MRI scans, and it’s linked to vascular risk factors, cognitive and motor impairment, and, in some cases, dementia or parkinsonism disease.

In general, the links are shaky, and not all CSVD patients develop dementia or parkinsonism. This could be explained by the fact that both white matter lesions (WML) and normal-appearing white matter have different underlying pathologies (NAWM). With standard MRI, neither can be fully appreciated. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides an alternate method of determining the microstructural integrity of white matter.

There has never been a study of the link between CSVD, its microstructural integrity, and incident dementia and parkinsonism disease.

What are the
symptoms of
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD)?

Pure Medical - Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Symptoms

What are the symptoms of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD)

The intensity of symptoms is usually related to whether the cerebral CSVD is mild, moderate, or severe as determined by radiological imaging.

Many elderly people with cerebral SVD will show no symptoms at all. This is referred to as “silent” CSVD.

Cerebral CSVD has been linked to a slew of issues, particularly when it is moderate or severe. These are some of them:

  • Cognitive impairment. Several studies, including this one, have linked cerebral CSVD to lower results on the Mini-Mental State Exam. “Vascular cognitive impairment” is a term used to describe issues with thinking skills that are linked to CSVD.
  • Problems with walking and balance. Gait abnormalities and mobility issues have been linked to white matter lesions on numerous occasions. The loss in gait and balance function was linked to moderate or severe cerebral CSVD, according to a 2013 study.
  • Strokes. White matter hyperintensities are linked to a more than two-fold increase in the risk of stroke, according to a 2010 meta-analysis.
  • Depression. White matter changes have been linked to an increased risk of depression in the elderly and may be a contributing factor to depression in persons who are experiencing it for the first time later in life.
  • Vascular dementia. Cerebral SVD symptoms are linked to the development of vascular dementia and the presence of vascular dementia.
  • Other dementias. Cerebral SVD has been linked to increased risk or severity of other types of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease, according to research. Many older persons with dementia show indications of both Alzheimer’s pathology and cerebral small vessel disease, according to autopsy investigations.
  • Transition to disability or death. Over a three-year follow-up period, 29.5 percent of participants with severe white matter abnormalities and 15.1 percent of participants with moderate white matter changes developed disabilities or died in a 2009 study of 639 non-disabled older people (mean age 74). Over the course of three years, only 10.5 percent of subjects with modest white matter alterations progressed to impairment or death. According to the findings, the severity of cerebral SVD is a significant risk factor for overall decline in older persons.

Some of the more common symptoms of CSVD in the brain:

  • Overall, older persons with any of the aforementioned issues are at significant risk of developing cerebral SVD.
  • Many elderly people with cerebral SVD on MRI are asymptomatic and have no symptoms. This is especially true for the elderly who have mild SVD in their brains.
  • Seniors with cerebral SVD are more likely to develop the issues listed above, frequently within a few years. This is especially true for persons who have moderate to severe SVD in their brains.

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease CSVD Desktop

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease CSVD

Causes & Risk Factors
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

 Causes of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Causes & Risk Factors
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

The cause of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease isn’t completely understood. It is a topic that has been the subject of extensive research, and experts in this field tend to become extremely technical while discussing it. (See the scientific studies linked below.) Because cerebral SVD is a large umbrella term that incorporates many various types of disorders with the brain’s small blood veins, it’s impossible to give an accurate response.

Certain risk factors for cerebral SVD have been found, however. Many of them overlap with stroke risk factors. They are as follows:

  • Hypertension
  • Dyslipidemia (e.g. high cholesterol)
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Cerebral amyloid angiopathy
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Age

How is
Cerebral Small Vessel Disease
diagnosed?

Diagnosis of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

How is Cerebral Small Vessel Disease diagnosed?

Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) includes white matter lesions (WML) and lacunar infarcts and is a frequent finding on computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of elderly people.

If you’re concerned about your risks for Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), or you’ve had symptoms, see your doctor. The main test used to diagnose this condition is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

An MRI uses strong magnets and radio waves to create detailed pictures of your brain. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) can appear on an MRI in a few different ways:

  • small strokes (lacunar infarcts)
  • white matter lesions that show up as bright spots on the scan (white matter hyperintensities)
  • bleeding from small blood vessels in the brain (cerebral microbleeds)

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease
Treatments

Treatment of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Treatments

Treatment usually entails reducing the risk factors that contribute to brain small blood vessel damage. Your doctor’s treatment method will be determined by your specific risk factors, but it may include:

  • Diet, exercise, weight loss, and medication can all help you lower your blood pressure. For adults over 60, the goal is to keep their systolic blood pressure (the top number) below 150.
  • Lower your cholesterol levels through diet, exercise, and, if necessary, statin medicines.
  • To lower homocysteine levels, use Vitamin b. Homocysteine is an amino acid that has been related to atherosclerosis and blood clots in high amounts.
  • Take aspirin or blood-thinning drugs to prevent strokes.
  • Quit smoking.

Alternative and Complementary therapies used
when treating (SVD) patients

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

The theory behind using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for cerebral small vessel disease is that increasing the supply of oxygen to the parts of the brain affected by SVD may lessen brain swelling and protect brain cells, reducing the extent of irreversible brain damage and leading to better outcomes.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy Improves Cognitive Functions in Older Adults.

 

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy and near-infrared light photons penetrate through the skull and into brain cells and spur the mitochondria to produce more ATP.

Infrared Sauna therapy

Red Light Therapy and Infrared sauna therapy Photons penetrate through the skull and into brain cells and spur the mitochondria to produce more ATP.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy outside the chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

The theory behind using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for cerebral small vessel disease is that increasing the supply of oxygen to the parts of the brain affected by SVD may lessen brain swelling and protect brain cells, reducing the extent of irreversible brain damage and leading to better outcomes.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy Improves Cognitive Functions in Older Adults.

 

Ozone Therapy

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is currently being used in the treatment of ischemic disorders such as Cerebral Small Vessel Disease.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy and near-infrared light photons penetrate through the skull and into brain cells and spur the mitochondria to produce more ATP.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy

Red Light Therapy and Infrared sauna therapy Photons penetrate through the skull and into brain cells and spur the mitochondria to produce more ATP.

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Prevention tips

Prevention of Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Prevention tips

Follow these tips to protect your brain from Cerebral small vessel disease:
  • Work with your doctor and a dietician to get your weight back into a healthy range if you’re overweight.
  • Follow a nutritious diet, such as the Mediterranean or DASH diets, which are low in saturated fat, sugar, and sodium.
  • If you smoke, choose a stop smoking approach that works for you. Counselling, nicotine replacement treatments, or drugs that diminish your desire to smoke are all options.
  • Your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels should all be monitored. If they’re out of range, work with your doctor to get them back under control.
  • On most days of the week, exercise for at least 30 minutes.
  • Alcohol should be consumed in moderation or avoided entirely.

Ask your GP what other preventive steps you should take based on your personal risk factors.

Cerebral small
vessel disease Statistics

Multiple Sclerosis Statistics Mobile

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Statistics

Although statistics are not published in the UK, CSVD (cerebral small vessel disease) is a prevalent neurological illness among the elderly. It causes strokes, dementia, mood swings, and gait issues.

Summary

Multiple Sclerosis Summary

Summary

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease can be very serious, leading to stroke, dementia, and death if it isn’t treated. It is believed to have caused around 45 percent of dementia cases and 20 percent of strokes.

Preventing small blood vessel injury in the first place is the best method to avoid these issues. To control your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, eat a balanced diet, exercise regularly, and take the medication your doctor prescribes.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michael Bennett, Robert Heard
NCBI – April 2010 – PMID: 20415839

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Boguslav H. Fischer, M.D., Morton Marks, M.D., and Theobald Reich, M.D.
NEJM – January 1983 – DOI: 10.1056/NEJM198301273080402

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Lucy Moore, Paul Eggleton, Gary Smerdon, Jia Newcombe, Janet E.Holley, Nicholas J.Gutowskiad, Miranda Smallwood
August 2020 – ScienceDirect – doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2020.102084

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
E Miller, J Kostka, T Włodarczyk, B Dugué
NCBI – December 2016 – PMID: 26778452

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Bartomiej Ptaszek, Aneta Telegów, Justyna Adamiak, Jacek Godzik, Szymon Podsiado, Dawid Mucha, Jakub Marchewka,Tomasz Halski and Dariusz Mucha
MDPI – May 2021 – doi.org/10.3390/jcm10132833

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
Safa Tahmasebi, Maytham T Qasim, Maria V Krivenkova, Angelina O Zekiy, Lakshmi Thangavelu, Surendar Aravindhan, Morteza Izadi, Farhad Jadidi-Niaragh, Mahnaz Ghaebi, Saeed Aslani, Leili Aghebat-Maleki, Majid Ahmadi, Leila Roshangar
NCIB – July 2021 – PMID: 33724614

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Ozone Therapy
Javad Ameli, Abdolali Banki, Fariborz Khorvash, Vincenzo Simonetti, Nematollah Jonaidi Jafari, and Morteza Izadi
NCIB – April 2019 – PMID: 31580307

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Farrah J Mateen, Natalie C Manalo, Sara J Grundy, Melissa A Houghton, Gladia C Hotan, Hans Erickson, Aleksandar Videnovic
NCIB – September 2017 – PMID: 28885372

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Red Light Therapy
Farrah J Mateen, Natalie C Manalo, Sara J Grundy, Melissa A Houghton, Gladia C Hotan, Hans Erickson, Aleksandar Videnovic
NCIB – September 2017 – PMID: 28885372

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Joy Hussain and Marc Cohen
NCBI – April 2018 – PMID: 29849692

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Dr. Kwasi Donyina
Clinical Trials – June 2010 – NCT00674934

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Pressotherapy
Amy Frost-Hunt
NCBI – December 2020 – PMID: 33282034

disclaimer