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Hashimoto’s disease

Hashimoto’s disease

Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune disorder
affecting the thyroid gland.
Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune disorder affecting the thyroid gland.
SYMPTOMS  |  CAUSES  |  DIAGNOSIS  |  RISKS  |  TREATMENTS  |  COMPLICATIONS  

Understanding Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

Thyroid function is harmed by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, often known as Hashimoto’s disease. Chronic autoimmune lymphocytic thyroiditis is another name for it. Hashimoto’s is the most frequent cause of hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid).

Your thyroid produces hormones that control your metabolism, body temperature, muscle strength, and a variety of other bodily activities.

When should you see a doctor?

Hashimoto’s disease has a wide range of signs and symptoms that are not unique to the condition. Because these symptoms could be caused by a variety of conditions, it’s critical to see your doctor as soon as possible for a prompt and correct diagnosis.

What are the signs
and symptoms of
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Hypothyroidism Symptoms

What are the signs and symptoms of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Different types of heart disease can cause a wide range of symptoms.

Hashimoto’s symptoms aren’t unique to the condition. Instead, it causes the symptoms of a thyroid that is underactive. The following are signs that your thyroid isn’t performing properly:

  • Constipation
  • Skin that is dry and pallid
  • Hoarse voice
  • Elevated cholesterol levels
  • Depression
  • Muscle weakness in the lower body
  • Fatigue
  • A lethargic feeling
  • Intolerance to the cold
  • Hair thinning
  • Periods that are irregular or heavy
  • Infertility difficulties

It’s possible that you’ve had Hashimoto’s for a long time before you notice any symptoms. It can take a long time for the condition to create obvious thyroid impairment.

An enlarged thyroid is a symptom of this illness in some people. This is known as a goitre, and it causes swelling in the front of your neck. A goitre is rarely painful, but it can be uncomfortable when touched. It may, however, make swallowing difficult or cause a feeling of fullness in your throat.

What Causes
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Hypothyroidism Causes

What Causes Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Thyroiditis caused by Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune disease. Thyroid cells are mistakenly attacked by white blood cells and antibodies in this situation. Doctors are baffled as to why this occurs, although some scientists believe genetic factors are at play.

How is
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis
diagnosed?

Hypothyroidism Diagnosis

How is Hashimoto’s thyroiditis diagnosed?

If you experience symptoms of an underactive thyroid, your doctor may suspect this illness. If that’s the case, they’ll run a blood test to see how much thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) you have. This simple test is one of the most effective techniques to detect Hashimoto’s disease. When thyroid activity is low, TSH hormone levels are high because the body is working overtime to stimulate the thyroid gland to create more thyroid hormones.

Blood tests may also be used by your doctor to assess your levels of:

  • Other thyroid hormones
  • Antibodies
  • Cholesterol
  • These tests can help confirm your diagnosis.

Am I at risk for developing
Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Hypothyroidism Risk Factors

Am I at risk for developing Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis has no recognised aetiology. However, various risk factors for the condition have been discovered. It is seven times more common in women than in men, especially in women who have just given birth. You may be at greater risk if you have a family history of autoimmune illnesses, such as:

  • Graves’ disease
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Lupus
  • Sjögren’s syndrome
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Vitiligo
  • Addison’s disease

What is the treatment
options for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

Hypothyroidism Treatment

What is the treatment options for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis?

The majority of people with Hashimoto’s disease require treatment. Your doctor may watch you for changes if your thyroid is working normally.

You’ll require medication if your thyroid isn’t producing enough hormones. Levothyroxine is a synthetic hormone that replaces the thyroid hormone thyroxine, which is lacking in some people (T4). It has almost no negative side effects. If you require this medication, you will almost certainly be on it for the rest of your life.

Thyroid hormone levels can be restored with regular use of levothyroxine. Your symptoms will normally go away once this happens. However, you’ll most likely need to have your hormone levels checked on a frequent basis. As a result, your doctor will be able to alter your dose as needed.

Consider the following:

The ability of your body to absorb levothyroxine can be harmed by some vitamins and drugs. Any other medications you’re taking should be discussed with your doctor. Some products that are known to interact negatively with levothyroxine include:

  • Supplements containing iron
  • Supplements for calcium
  • Proton pump inhibitors are a type of acid reflux medication
  • Some cholesterol-lowering drugs
  • Oestrogen

When using other medications, you may need to change the time of day you take your thyroid prescription. This drug’s absorption may be hampered by certain foods. According to your diet, talk to your doctor about the best way to take thyroid medication.

Alternative and Complementary therapies used
when treating Heart Disease patients

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can reduce inflammation, balance the immune system, increase energy levels and improve brain function 2, 3.

Cryotherapy

Whole-body Cryotherapy is a good way to alleviate hypothyroidism symptoms and maybe improve thyroid function: TNF-a and IL-2 pro-inflammatory cytokines have been demonstrated to be reduced by whole-body cryotherapy. 4.

Ozone therapy

Studies suggest that the depression of the pituitary-thyroid axis may be an adaptive mechanism during  Ozone therapy by reducing hypothalamic stimulation via thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and at the same time lifting the hypothalamic catecholamine inhibition on PRL release. Both may be necessary alterations in order to develop tolerance during ozone exposure 5.

Red Light Therapy

Studies found that Red light therapy improved thyroid hormone levels enough that they required, on average, roughly half as much thyroid hormone medication. 6, 7.

Infrared Sauna therapy

Infrared sauna therapy offers so many benefits for people in general and those dealing with chronic illnesses such as Hypothyroidism these include: Detoxification, Relaxation, Better Sleep, Stimulates your Immune System, Joint Pain Relief, Improved Circulation, Weight Loss, Relief Sore Muscles, Helps people with Chronic Fatigue, Improves Chronic Heart Failure. 8.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy outside the chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can reduce inflammation, balance the immune system, increase energy levels and improve brain function 2, 3.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

Whole-body Cryotherapy is a good way to alleviate hypothyroidism symptoms and maybe improve thyroid function: TNF-a and IL-2 pro-inflammatory cytokines have been demonstrated to be reduced by whole-body cryotherapy. 4.

Ozone Therapy

Ozone therapy

Studies suggest that the depression of the pituitary-thyroid axis may be an adaptive mechanism during  Ozone therapy by reducing hypothalamic stimulation via thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and at the same time lifting the hypothalamic catecholamine inhibition on PRL release. Both may be necessary alterations in order to develop tolerance during ozone exposure 5.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy

Studies found that Red light therapy improved thyroid hormone levels enough that they required, on average, roughly half as much thyroid hormone medication. 6, 7.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy

Infrared sauna therapy offers so many benefits for people in general and those dealing with chronic illnesses such as Hypothyroidism these include: Detoxification, Relaxation, Better Sleep, Stimulates your Immune System, Joint Pain Relief, Improved Circulation, Weight Loss, Relief Sore Muscles, Helps people with Chronic Fatigue, Improves Chronic Heart Failure. 8.

What are the complications
related to Hashimoto’s?

Hypothyroidism Complications

What are the complications related to Hashimoto’s?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, if left untreated, can lead to a variety of consequences, some of which are life-threatening. These can include the following:

  • Cardiac issues, such as heart failure
  • Anaemia
  • Consciousness loss and confusion
  • Elevated cholesterol levels
  • Reduced libido
  • Depression
  • Anxiety

Hashimoto’s disease might also cause complications while pregnant. According to recent studies, mothers who have this syndrome are more likely to have babies with heart, brain, and renal problems.

In order to avoid these difficulties, women with thyroid problems should have their thyroid function monitored during their pregnancy. Routine thyroid monitoring during pregnancy is not recommended for women who have no known thyroid abnormalities.