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Chronic Pain Syndrome

Chronic Pain Syndrome

After an injury heals or a disease has run its course, most pain goes away. However, discomfort from chronic pain syndrome can continue for months or even years after the body has healed. It can also happen when there isn’t a known cause for the pain.
After an injury heals or a disease has run its course, most pain goes away. However, discomfort from chronic pain syndrome can continue for months or even years after the body has healed. It can also happen when there isn’t a known cause for the pain.

Understanding
Chronic Pain Syndrome

Your body’s natural reaction to an accident or illness is pain, which serves as a warning that something is wrong. You normally stop hurting when your body heals.

However, for many people, pain persists long after the cause has passed. Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts for three to six months or more. When you’re in pain every day, it can have a negative impact on your mental and physical health.

About a quarter of persons who suffer from Chronic Pain Syndrome eventually develop chronic pain syndrome (CPS). This occurs when patients have symptoms other than pain, such as depression and anxiety, that interfere with their daily life.

Around 15.5 million people in England (34% of the population) suffer from chronic pain syndrome. Approximately 5.5 million people (12% of the population) have high-impact chronic pain syndrome and struggle to take part in daily activities.

What are the signs and symptoms of
Chronic pain syndrome (CPS)?

Pure Medical - Symptoms of Chronic Pain Syndrome

What are the signs and symptoms
of
Chronic pain syndrome (CPS)?

Chronic pain syndrome has a negative impact on your physical and mental well-being. While the pain may be persistent, there may be flare-ups of more extreme pain as stress or activity levels rise. Among the signs and symptoms are:

  • Joint pain
  • Muscle aches
  • Burning pain
  • Fatigue
  • Poor Sleep
  • Loss of stamina and flexibility, due to decreased activity
  • Mood problems, including depression, anxiety, and irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Feeling very tired or wiped out
  • Irritability
  • Guilt
  • Loss of interest in sex
  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • Marriage or family problems
  • Job loss
  • Suicidal thoughts

According to a study published in the journal Pain, 60.8 percent of those with chronic pain also had depression, with the majority of them having “severe” symptoms. Some patients with CPS require increasing amounts of medication to control their pain, which can lead to drug addiction.

Chronic Pain Syndrome
Getting a Diagnosis

Pure Medical - Diagnosis of Chronic Pain Syndrome

Getting a Diagnosis Chronic Pain Syndrome

Your GP will enquire about any illnesses or injuries that may have contributed to your discomfort. Other questions will be asked to discover more about the type of pain you’re experiencing and how long you’ve had it:

  • When did the pain start?
  • Where on your body does it hurt?
  • What does the pain feel like? Is it throbbing, pounding, shooting, sharp, pinching, stinging, burning, etc.?
  • How severe is your pain on a scale of 1 to 10?
  • What seems to set off the pain or make it worse?
  • Have any treatments relieved it?

Because certain illnesses can cause chronic pain syndrome, your doctor may conduct an imaging test to see whether there is any joint or tissue damage that could be the source of your discomfort. Imaging tests can reveal whether you have a joint injury or other pain-causing issues:

  • A CT scan or computed tomography scan is a high-powered X-ray that creates detailed images of your internal organs.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a type of imaging that uses radio waves to produce images. It creates images of your organs and structures inside you using magnets and radio waves, for example, this would determine if your pain is stemming from a herniated disk
  • An X-ray creates photographs of structures in your body using low-dose radiation, for example, to see if you have osteoarthritis.
  • A blood test to check for rheumatoid arthritis.

Some GPs will reject your symptoms or tell you they are “all in your head” if they can’t uncover a direct cause of your pain — or if they believe the pain is disproportionate to the trigger. When you’re sick, it’s difficult to be proactive, but keep looking for alternatives. If necessary, discuss what you believe is causing your pain with your doctor and request the necessary tests and treatments. You have the best chance of getting relief if you work as a team.

Chronic Pain Syndrome
Causes & Risk Factors

Pure Medical - Causes of Chronic Pain Syndrome

Causes & Risk Factors Chronic Pain Syndrome

Chronic pain syndrome is frequently associated with conditions that produce extensive and long-lasting pain. These are some of the conditions:

  • Acid reflux or ulcers
  • Endometriosis. When tissue in the uterus grows outside of it
  • Osteoarthritis. This type of arthritis happens when the protective cartilage between bones wears away as a result of normal wear and tear on the body.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. A type of arthritis that affects the joints. This is an autoimmune illness that results in painful joint inflammation.
  • Headaches
  • Backache. Muscle strains, nerve compression, or spinal arthritis can all cause discomfort (called spinal stenosis).
  • Fibromyalgia. This is a neurological disorder that produces pain and soreness throughout the body (known as trigger points).
  • Lyme Disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A condition that the intestines become inflamed This disorder causes persistent inflammation of the digestive tract, which can cause pain and cramping in the intestines.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Trauma caused by surgery.
  • Muscle strains and sprains
  • Nerve Damage
  • Cancer. That has progressed.

Even if these illnesses improve (via medications or therapies), some persons may nevertheless suffer from chronic pain. Miscommunication between the brain and nerve system is the most common cause of this sort of pain. (Some people can experience this type of discomfort without any identified triggers for unknown reasons.)

Chronic Pain Syndrome can alter the behaviour of neurons (brain cells that transmit and interpret sensory information), rendering them susceptible to pain signals. According to the NHS, 20% of patients with osteoarthritis who have their knees replaced (and thus have no further painful joint difficulties) nonetheless have chronic pain.

Chronic pain has both physical and mental causes. Some doctors believe that patients with the illness have a problem with the body’s stress-handling system of neurons and glands. They experience pain in a different way as a result of this.

CPS, according to some experts, is a taught response. Even after the pain is gone or has decreased, you may start to repeat certain harmful behaviours while you’re in pain.

Chronic pain syndrome can impact people of all ages and genders, but it affects women the most. People who suffer from significant depression or other mental illnesses are more likely to receive CPS.

Risk factors

According to research, certain persons are more prone to chronic pain syndrome than others. They are as follows:

  • Those who suffer from persistent discomforts, such as arthritis.
  • Those who are suffering from depression. Experts aren’t sure why this is, but one thought is that depression alters how the brain receives and interprets nervous system impulses.
  • Those who take up smoking. There are no conclusive answers yet, but specialists are looking into why smoking tends to make arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other chronic pain diseases worse. According to the NHS, smokers account for half of all people seeking pain relief.
  • Obese individuals. According to studies, half of the patients seeking obesity therapy have mild to severe pain. Experts aren’t clear if this is because of the stress that extra weight places on the body or because of the complicated way obesity interact with the body’s hormones and metabolism.
  • Those who have female gender. Women are more sensitive to pain than men. This could be related to hormones or changes in the density of female and male nerve fibres, according to researchers.
  • Those over the age of 65. As you become older, you’re more susceptible to a variety of ailments that might cause chronic pain.

Chronic Pain Syndrome Treatment

Pure Medical - Treatment of Chronic Pain Syndrome

Chronic Pain Syndrome Treatment

Chronic Pain Syndrome is difficult to understand, but it is treatable. Among the treatment options are:

Medical

  • Pain-relieving medications. Anti-inflammatories, steroids, muscle relaxants, antidepressants with pain-relieving properties, and, in severe circumstances, opioids are examples (this is the last resort).
  • Physical treatment to improve range of motion and flexibility.
  • Nerve blocks are used to block pain impulses.
  • Behavioural and/or psychological therapy while certain psychological therapies may not have a significant impact on the pain, they can improve mood. For instance, cognitive behaviour therapy (a sort of talk therapy that helps you reframe negative thinking) has been found to improve mood for up to a year after treatment. Biofeedback was found to be effective in lowering muscle tension and sadness, as well as improving chronic pain coping in another study. Biofeedback is a sort of therapy that teaches you how to manage body reactions with your thoughts, such as rapid breathing.

Alternative

  • Acupuncture. According to a review of studies, acupuncture reduced pain in 50% of those who tried it, compared to a 30% reduction in those who did not.
  • Hypnosis. According to research, after a course of hypnosis, 71% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) reported significantly better symptoms. These effects lasted for up to five years after the medication was stopped.
  • Yoga. Yoga has been shown to help reduce depression and anxiety associated with chronic pain by relaxing muscles, encouraging deep, restorative breathing, and increasing mindfulness.

 

 

 

Alternative and Complementary therapies used
when treating Chronic Pain Syndrome patients

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been effectively used to reduce chronic pain, especially chronic pain syndrome, fibromyalgia syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, myofascial pain syndrome, migraine, and cluster headaches.

Cryotherapy

Experts believe that whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) can reduce swelling, which is tied to pain. It may also reduce sensitivity to pain. Cryotherapy may be particularly effective when you are managing pain with swelling, especially around a joint or tendon.

 

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is highly effective in relieving acute and chronic lower back pain and sciatica and this treatment can be administered as a first option rather than epidural steroids.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy has been shown to have significant biological effects on patients. For example, red light therapy is used to manage depression. Several clinical trials have shown that certain wavelengths of light can improve wound healing, decrease temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ) pain, and decrease back pain.

Infrared Sauna therapy

Research shows that Infrared sauna therapycan reduce pain even for those dealing with painful conditions like, fibromyalgia, chronic headaches, and rheumatoid arthritis, by releasing your body’s natural painkillers, endorphins, which have an opioid-like effect.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy outside the chamber

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been effectively used to reduce chronic pain, especially fibromyalgia syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, myofascial pain syndrome, migraine, and cluster headaches.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy

Experts believe that whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) can reduce swelling, which is tied to pain. It may also reduce sensitivity to pain. Cryotherapy may be particularly effective when you are managing pain with swelling, especially around a joint or tendon.

 

Ozone Therapy

Ozone therapy

Ozone therapy is highly effective in relieving acute Chronic Pain Syndrome especially in the lower back pain and sciatica and this treatment can be administered as a first option rather than epidural steroids.

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy

Red Light Therapy has been shown to have significant biological effects on patients. For example, red light therapy is used to manage depression. Several clinical trials have shown that certain wavelengths of light can improve wound healing, decrease temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJ) pain, and decrease back pain.

Infrared Sauna Therapy Mobile

Infrared Sauna therapy

Research shows that Infrared sauna therapy can reduce pain even for those dealing with painful conditions like, Chronic Pain Syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic headaches, and rheumatoid arthritis, by releasing your body’s natural painkillers, endorphins, which have an opioid-like effect.

Summary

Pure Medical - Summary of Chronic Pain Syndrome

Summary

Managing Chronic Pain Syndrome might be challenging when you aren’t feeling well. Emotional stress can exacerbate discomfort. Working can be difficult, and you may want to consider receiving disability benefits.

Consider the following strategies for dealing with chronic pain:

  • Concentrate on the positive aspects of your life.
  • Make an effort to be involved. Don’t isolate yourself from family and friends, or from things that you enjoy and can still participate in.
  • Become a member of a support group. A referral from your doctor or a local hospital may be possible.
  • Seek both psychological and physical assistance. Also, if you believe your doctors are dismissing your suffering, keep looking. There are kind medical professionals out there. For references, ask friends for recommendations and contact support groups, health organisations focused on a certain disorder, and local hospitals.
  • Exercise and, if possible, continuing to work are essential for managing persistent pain, often known as chronic pain, and living a fuller life.

Chronic Pain Syndrome Treatment & Therapy
Scientific Studies

In this section, you will find an array of Chronic Pain Syndrome Treatment & Therapy scientific case studies.
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Michal Hájek, Dittmar Chmelar, Jakub Tlapák, František Novomeský, Veronika Rybárová, Miloslav Klugar
NCBI – March 2021 – PMID: 33761551

disclaimer

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)
Senol Yildiz, Gunalp Uzun, M Zeki Kiralp
NCBI – April 2006 – PMID: 16539861

disclaimer

Cryotherapy
Carol Garcia, Jay Karri, Nicholas A Zacharias, Alaa Abd-Elsayed
NCBI – June 2021 – PMID: 33315183

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
Umberto Tirelli, Marianno Franzini, Luigi Valdenassi, Sergio Pandolfi, Massimiliano Berretta, Giovanni Ricevuti, Salvatore Chirumbolo
NCBI – December 2021 – PMID: 35011770

disclaimer

Ozone Therapy
Robert Jay Rowen, Howard Robins
NCBI – May 2019 – PMID: 31062104

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Ozone Therapy
Umberto Tirelli, Cinzia Cirrito, Martina Pavanello
PPJ- September 2018 – DOI: 10.4081/ozone.2018.7812

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Di Hu, Shuyu Zhu, and Jason Robert Potas
NCIB – August 2016 – PMID: 27561854

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Sarah Myhill, Norman E Booth, and John McLaren-Howard
NCIB – November 2012 – PMID: 23236553

disclaimer

Red Light Therapy
Howard B Cotler, Roberta T Chow, Michael R Hamblin, and James Carroll
NCIB – June 2016 – PMID: 26858986

disclaimer

Infrared Sauna Therapy
Eun-Hee Cho, Nam-Hun Kim, Hyoung-Chun Kim, Yun-Ho Yang, Juyoun Kim, and Byeongmun Hwang
NCIB – October 2019 – PMID: 33329780

disclaimer